In this Book

buy this book Buy This Book in Print
summary
In 1933 Congress granted American laborers the right of collective bargaining, but farmworkers got no New Deal. Cindy Hahamovitch's pathbreaking account of migrant farmworkers along the Atlantic Coast shows how growers enlisted the aid of the state in an unprecedented effort to keep their fields well stocked with labor. This is the story of the farmworkers--Italian immigrants from northeastern tenements, African American laborers from the South, and imported workers from the Caribbean--who came to work in the fields of New Jersey, Georgia, and Florida in the decades after 1870. These farmworkers were not powerless, the author argues, for growers became increasingly open to negotiation as their crops ripened in the fields. But farmers fought back with padrone or labor contracting schemes and 'work-or-fight' forced-labor campaigns. Hahamovitch describes how growers' efforts became more effective as federal officials assumed the role of padroni, supplying farmers with foreign workers on demand. Today's migrants are as desperate as ever, the author concludes, not because poverty is an inevitable feature of modern agricultural work, but because the federal government has intervened on behalf of growers, preventing farmworkers from enjoying the fruits of their labor. This is the story of the farmworkers--Italian immigrants, African American laborers, and imported workers from the Caribbean--who came to work in the fields of New Jersey, Georgia, and Florida in the decades after 1870. In 1933 Congress granted American laborers the right of collective bargaining, but farmworkers got no New Deal. Cindy Hahamovitch's pathbreaking account of migrant farmworkers along the Atlantic Coast shows how growers enlisted the aid of the state in an unprecedented effort to keep their fields well stocked with labor. In 1933 Congress granted American laborers the right of collective bargaining, but farmworkers got no New Deal. Cindy Hahamovitch's pathbreaking account of migrant farmworkers along the Atlantic Coast shows how growers enlisted the aid of the state in an unprecedented effort to keep their fields well stocked with labor. This is the story of the farmworkers--Italian immigrants from northeastern tenements, African American laborers from the South, and imported workers from the Caribbean--who came to work in the fields of New Jersey, Georgia, and Florida in the decades after 1870. These farmworkers were not powerless, the author argues, for growers became increasingly open to negotiation as their crops ripened in the fields. But farmers fought back with padrone or labor contracting schemes and 'work-or-fight' forced-labor campaigns. Hahamovitch describes how growers' efforts became more effective as federal officials assumed the role of padroni, supplying farmers with foreign workers on demand. Today's migrants are as desperate as ever, the author concludes, not because poverty is an inevitable feature of modern agricultural work, but because the federal government has intervened on behalf of growers, preventing farmworkers from enjoying the fruits of their labor.

Table of Contents

  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. 1-4
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. IIlustrations and Maps
  2. pp. vii-viii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-xii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Abbreviations and Acronyms
  2. pp. xiii-xiv
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 3-13
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 1. A Perfectly Irresistible Change: The Transformation of East Coast Agriculture
  2. pp. 14-37
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 2. The Sacrifice of Golden Boys and Girls: The Padrone System and New Jersey Agriculture
  2. pp. 38-54
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 3. Progressives as Padroni: Labor Distribution and the Agrarian Ideal
  2. pp. 55-78
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 4. Work or Fight: The State as Padrone during the First World War
  2. pp. 79-112
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 5. The Sunshine State Meets the Garden State: Farm Labor during the Long Depression
  2. pp. 113-137
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 6. Wards of the State: Farmworker Unionism and the New Deal
  2. pp. 138-150
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 7. Uncle Sam as Padrone: The Politics of Labor Supply in Depression and War
  2. pp. 151-181
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 8. The Union as Padrone: The "Underground Railroad" during the Second World War
  2. pp. 182-199
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Epilogue
  2. pp. 200-204
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Notes
  2. pp. 205-246
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 247-274
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 275-288
  3. restricted access Download |

Additional Information

ISBN
9781469603964
Related ISBN
9780807823309
MARC Record
OCLC
654452956
Pages
304
Launched on MUSE
2014-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.