Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 2-7

CONTENTS

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 8-9

read more

AUTHOR’S NOTE ON SOURCES

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

I used several principles of inclusion and exclusion in identifying the texts on which this book rests. I started by creating a comprehensive bibliography of local histories of all the towns and cities of Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island published between 1820 and 1880, using the indispensable volumes produced by the Committee for a New England Bibliography.1 ...

read more

INTRODUCTION: Indians Can Never Be Modern

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xxvi

On June 3, 1856, Harvard legal scholar Emory Washburn, fresh from a brief term as governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, stood to address the people of Bridgewater on the two hundredth anniversary of its legal incorporation.1 They were gathered, he proclaimed, “to lay the offerings of cherished memories and honest pride upon altars which our fathers reared here in years that are past.”2 ...

read more

1. FIRSTING: Local Texts Claim Indian Places As Their Own

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-53

Enoch Sanford named his 1870 narrative History of Raynham, Massachusetts,from the First Settlement to the Present Time.1 Sanford’s title for his fifty-one-page survey of local history resembled those given many other histories. ...

read more

2. REPLACING: Historical Practices Argue That Non-Indians Have Supplanted Indians

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 55-104

Local narrators in New England simultaneously embraced and replaced Indian peoples in shaping their story about New England history, collectively arguing for the primacy of the new modern social order they claimed as their hallmark. Their accounts of the past, present, and future entailed a process of physically and imaginatively replacing Indians on the landscape of New England. ...

read more

3. LASTING: Texts Purify the Landscape of Indians by Denying Them a Place in Modernity

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 105-143

Thomas Gray’s poem “Change,” which was read at the commemoration of the English arrival in Roxbury in 1830, provides a fascinating window on a crucial theme of nineteenth-century local narration in connection to what might be thought of as the temporalities of race.1 Even though Indians are not the explicit focus of his poem, the implicit argument posed is that Indians reside in an ahistorical temporality ...

read more

4. RESISTING: Claims in Texts about Indian Extinction Fail Even As They Are Being Made

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 145-199

The temporalities of race that insisted Indians remain mired in a static past blinded New Englanders to an important fact: Indians resisted their effacement from New England in the nineteenth century by embracing change in order to make their way in a changing world, as they had done for centuries. Their ongoing resistance to settler colonialism took multiple forms and translated into their survival as Indian peoples. ...

read more

CONCLUSION: The Continuing Struggle over Recognition

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 201-206

In 2000 the U.S. Census Bureau implemented a dramatic change in enumerating “race” and especially in how it counted American Indians. Rather than insisting upon a unitary classification of race and employing the monolithic category “American Indian or Native Pacific Islander,” this census permitted respondents to designate more than one race, and it elicited precise tribal information. ...

read more

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 207-210

This book has been a labor of love for more than a decade, and along the way I have accumulated enormous debts that I am grateful to have the opportunity to acknowledge here. So many smart and generous people offered their carefully composed thoughts on elements of this project that I am sure to miss some of them, and for that I apologize. ...

NOTES

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 211-259

INDEX

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 261-269

read more

About the Author

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 297-297

Jean M. O’Brien (White Earth Ojibwe) is professor of history at the University of Minnesota, where she is also affiliated with American Indian studies and American studies. She is the author of ...