In this Book

Militarized Currents
summary
Foregrounding indigenous and feminist scholarship, this collection analyzes militarization as an extension of colonialism from the late twentieth to the twenty-first century in Asia and the Pacific. The contributors theorize the effects of militarization across former and current territories of Japan and the United States, such as Guam, Okinawa, the Marshall Islands, the Philippines, and Korea, demonstrating that the relationship between militarization and colonial subordination—and their gendered and racialized processes—shapes and produces bodies of memory, knowledge, and resistance.
 
Contributors: Walden Bello, U of the Philippines; Michael Lujan Bevacqua, U of Guam; Patti Duncan, Oregon State U; Vernadette Vicuña Gonzalez, U of Hawai‘i, M noa; Insook Kwon, Myongji U; Laurel A. Monnig, U of Illinois, Urbana–Champaign; Katharine H. S. Moon, Wellesley College; Jon Kamakawiwo‘ole Osorio, U of Hawai‘i, M noa; Naoki Sakai, Cornell U; Fumika Sato, Hitotsubashi U; Theresa Cenidoza Suarez, California State U, San Marcos; Teresia K. Teaiwa, Victoria U, Wellington; Wesley Iwao Ueunten, San Francisco State U.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. 1-1
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. 2-5
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Foreword
  2. pp. vii-x
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xi-xiv
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  1. Introduction: Militarized Currents, Decolonizing Futures
  2. pp. xv-xlviii
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  1. I. Militarized Bodies of Memory
  2. pp. 1-2
  1. 1. Memorializing Pu'uloa and Remembering Pearl Harbor
  2. pp. 3-14
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  1. 2. Bikinis and Other S/pacific N/oceans
  2. pp. 15-32
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  1. 3. The Exceptional Life and Death of a Chamorro Soldier: Tracing the Militarization of Desire in Guam, USA
  2. pp. 33-62
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  1. 4. Touring Military Masculinities: U.S.–Philippines Circuits of Sacrifice and Gratitude in Corregidor and Bataan
  2. pp. 63-88
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  1. II. Militarized Movements
  2. pp. 89-90
  1. 5. Rising Up from a Sea of Discontent: The 1970 Koza Uprising in U.S.-Occupied Okinawa
  2. pp. 91-124
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  1. 6. South Korean Movements against Militarized Sexual Labor
  2. pp. 125-146
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  1. 7. Uncomfortable Fatigues: Chamorro Soldiers, Gendered Identities, and the Question of Decolonization in Guam
  2. pp. 147-180
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  1. 8. Militarized Filipino Masculinity and the Language of Citizenship in San Diego
  2. pp. 181-202
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  1. III. Hetero/Homo-sexualized Militaries
  2. pp. 203-204
  1. 9. On Romantic Love and Military Violence: Transpacific Imperialism and U.S.–Japan Complicity
  2. pp. 205-222
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  1. 10. Masculinity and Male-on-Male Sexual Violence in the Military: Focusing on the Absence of the Issue
  2. pp. 223-250
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  1. 11. Why Have the Japanese Self-Defense Forces Included Women? The State's "Nonfeminist Reasons"
  2. pp. 251-276
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  1. 12. Genealogies of Unbelonging: Amerasians and Transnational Adoptees as Legacies of U.S. Militarism in South Korea
  2. pp. 277-308
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  1. Conclusion: From American Lake to a People's Pacific in the Twenty-First Century
  2. pp. 309-322
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 323-326
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 327-355
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