Cover

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Frontmatter

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Title Page

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Copyright Page

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Table of Contents

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Preface

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pp. vii-x

Following the achievement of independence in 1821, Mexico entered a period of marked instability. The young nation was crippled by its eleven-year-long civil war and a hostile international context in which, apart from Britain and the United States, most...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xiv

In June 2007 I was the recipient of a major Arts and Humanities Research Council (ahrc) research grant amounting to more than £610,000, which funded a three-year project on “The Pronunciamiento in Independent Mexico, 1821–1876” (2007–10). This...

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Introduction: The Nineteenth-Century Practice of the Pronunciamiento and Its Origins

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pp. xv-xl

What was a pronunciamiento? It is a question that is not easy to answer given that nineteenth-century Mexicans used the term for a whole range of political interventions. To consider as a case in point the 19 May 1822 show of force in Mexico City that resulted in Agust

Chronology of Main Events and Pronunciamientos, 1821–1853

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pp. xli-l

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1. Iguala: The Prototype

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pp. 1-21

The phenomenon of the pronunciamiento in nineteenth-century Mexico should be seen as part of the process of struggle toward political identity and the creation of the nation-state. Independence launched a history of transition, partial fragmentation, and continuity; it was the beginning of that transition, not the conclusion. As Alicia...

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2. Agust

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pp. 22-46

The first decades of the nineteenth century were turbulent in most of Europe and the Americas. In Europe Napoleon challenged the absolute monarchies at the same time as their overseas territories witnessed the emergence of opposition movements in which autonomist and pro-independence aspirations...

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3. Two Reactions to the Illegitimate Succession of 1828: Campeche and Jalapa

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pp. 47-73

After two years in which the republic enjoyed a degree of constitutional order and relative peace, political discontent surfaced as a result of the behavior of the Masonic lodges. The Scottish Lodge (or escoceses), introduced into Mexico by the Spanish expeditionary forces, dominated the army officer ranks and recruited a significant number of politicians. By 1825, although the lodge had lost its initial momentum and attractiveness, President ...

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4. Municipalities, Prefects, and Pronunciamientos: Power and Political Mobilizations in the Huasteca during the First Federal Republic

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pp. 74-100

One often-overlooked facet of pronunciamientos is their impact on society and politics in rural Mexico. This chapter explores the connections between local actors and national politics during the First Federal Republic’s period of crisis, 1830 to 1834, describing how pronunciamientos unfolded in the Huasteca...

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5. The Origins of the Pronunciamientos of San Luis Potos

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pp. 101-124

The purpose of this chapter is not to analyze the origins of the many pronunciamientos from the purely regional perspective of San Luis Potos

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6. The British and an Early Pronunciamiento, 1833–1834

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pp. 125-142

Confirmation of the occupation of Mexico City on 27 September 1821 by Agust

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7. The Origins of the Santiago Imán Re volt,1838–1840: A Reassessment

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pp. 143-161

The pro-federalist-turned-secessionist Santiago Imán pronunciamiento of 1838–40, which was claimed to have erupted in direct opposition to the Mexican centralist Anastasio Bustamante administration of 1837, was probably the epitome of the unstable relations that existed between Yucatán and Mexico...

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8. A Reluctant Advocate: Mariano Otero andthe Revoluci

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pp. 162-179

As the ideological standard bearer of the moderado or moderate movement, Mariano Otero was firmly opposed to the practice of pronunciamientos. He was vehemently opposed to military interference and any dominant role by the army in politics, although he did make one important exception. Originally...

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9. Constitution and Congress: A Pronunciamiento for Legality, December 1844

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pp. 180-202

The pronunciamiento of 6 December 1844, in Mexico City, is one of the most atypical in nineteenth-century Mexico. Its speed and effectiveness were astonishing: it succeeded in only three hours, causing the collapse of Valentín Canalizo’s government and the most resounding fall of General Antonio...

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10. “The Curious Manner in Which Pronunciamientos Are Got Up in This Country”: The Plan of Blancarte of 26 July 1852

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pp. 203-225

On 3 October 1852 Percy Doyle, the British plenipotentiary in Mexico, wrote in a letter to the Earl of Malmesbury: “In Guadalajara the Santa Anna Party have quarrelled with the other parties and a complete division has taken place amongst them; what has taken place in that town may be perhaps best explained...

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11. Inventing the Nation: The Pronunciamiento and the Construction of Mexican National Identity, 1821–1876

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pp. 226-245

Pronunciamientos were a constant in everyday life in Mexico following independence and throughout much of the nineteenth century. It is because of this that the pronunciamiento phenomenon can be studied not only from a historical...

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12. “I Pronounce Thus I Exist”: Redefining the Pronunciamiento in Independent Mexico, 1821–1876

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pp. 246-266

Fran

Bibliography

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pp. 267-308

Contributors

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pp. 309-314