Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 2-5

Contents

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pp. vi-7

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-9

The essays in this volume were first discussed at a workshop in Montréal in the fall of 2006, generously funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and by Concordia University. For their help in the initial planning for that event and in the subsequent production of this volume, I owe thanks...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-19

The essays in this volume discuss moments in the history of philology, a history of the ever-changing regulation, disciplining, and interpreting of texts. When philologists take up the tools of textual criticism, they contribute to the very form of texts, and when they adopt articulate protocols to define correct interpretation, they...

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Reading Outside the Library

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pp. 20-46

The subject of this essay is the primary evidence for practical applications of philology in the Greco-Roman world. For present purposes, I use “philology” in a broad sense, to embrace various sorts of practical attention applied to manuscripts in order to bring a reader as close as possible to a proper understanding of an author’s words. The evidence treated here consists of the marginal and interlinear notes in...

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Philologizing Philologists: A Case Study

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pp. 47-74

Modern conceptions of the term “philology,” no matter how divergent, all proceed from the basic notion that philology is a field which is concerned with the use of words.1 For those who are concerned with the use of ancient words, the meaning of the term “philology” is, largely by necessity, attenuated to the study of written...

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Angelo Poliziano’s Lamia

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pp. 75-106

These lines open Angelo Poliziano’s Lamia, a praelectio or preliminary oration, which he delivered in the fall of 1492 to open the course he was teaching on Aristotle’s Prior Analytics at the Florentine university. In the work, Poliziano is responding to objections from contemporaries, who suggested that he did not have the training...

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Philology and the Emblem

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pp. 107-126

My contention in these pages is that philology displays a surprising but close family resemblance to the early modern emblem. To be more precise: just as emblems are philological, so too is philology emblematic. In fact, it may be legitimate to ask which discourse exerts more genealogical influence on the other. In order to substantiate...

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On the Road

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pp. 127-147

In an edited volume on the history of philology it should come as no surprise that so many of the contributors ask what “philology” is. Do we all agree on just what it is we are recovering? Absolutely not: that is what makes the endeavor exciting. Philology is a slippery concept, one that seems simple and perhaps even discreet, but which has developed a broad range of meanings and implications...

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What is Philology? Cultural Studies and Ecdotics

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pp. 148-163

In 1982 Paul de Man wrote “The Return to Philology,” bringing to the stage, at least within much modern literary scholarship, a term that many would have found difficult to define with any measure of confidence. In Paul de Man’s wake, Harvard organized a conference in 1988 on the topic “What is Philology?” It was published in 1990 as both a special issue of the journal Comparative Literature Studies...

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Nietzsche, Rhetoric, Philology

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pp. 164-191

No inquiry into the problem of philology, its history, and its chances for recovery and a productive future can afford to overlook Friedrich Nietzsche, who perhaps more than anyone else in the nineteenth century helped to set the agenda for a critical and above all self-critical practice of philology. He paid for his act of daring, for his refusal...

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The Philosophy of Philology and the Crisis of Reading

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pp. 192-212

How should one think about philology? Is it a subject that lends itself to or even demands philosophical treatment? And how do the general (and thus perhaps philosophical) matters about philology relate to the knotty singularities of reading a given or not-so-given text? Almost as long as the existence of the modern notion of philology...

Works Cited

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pp. 213-228

Contributors

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pp. 229-230

Index

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pp. 231-254