Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 2-8

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Series Editors’ Foreword

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

Talking to strangers can be dangerous. We tell our kids not to. They look so familiar, but looks can be deceiving. Who knows who these people are? Of course, the whole possibility of conversation depends on us not knowing these people, on a certain constitutive opacity and hence danger. ...

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xiv

This book is, amongst other things, about memory and recollection. Drafting our acknowledgments, we recall, in conversation, that first exchange in a corridor in the Institute of Classical Studies in London about research and what each one of us might do next, and the surprise we felt when we realized that we were thinking about shifting our research to the same period. ...

read more

1. Introduction. Talking to Strangers: Classical Readings and the Modern Self

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-26

The project that gave rise to this book started as a conversation; conversations marked its progress and this book is, ultimately, a form of literary conversation. The conversation started with a casual remark, a gesture of incomprehension on the part of a historian faced with a literary text. ...

read more

2. Home Alone: Terror and Power

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 27-64

In his account of the year of four emperors in Rome, when we are approaching the final acts of the civil conflict, Tacitus takes us with Vitellius, the defeated emperor, on a last journey from his private residence to the imperial palace, a journey that reverses his surprising political trajectory. ...

read more

3. Death and Love: Rationality and Passion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 65-106

In Ep. V 3, Pliny writes to Aristo to defend himself in response to a report of a literary discussion held at Aristo’s house. The discussion centered on Pliny’s poetry. There were some “who did not disapprove of the writings themselves, but castigated me [Pliny] in a friendly and straightforward manner, since I wrote and recited them.” ...

read more

4. Private Partners and Family Dramas

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 107-140

After the highly artificial treatment of the poetry of homosexual desire, discussed in the previous chapter, Pliny’s very next letter continues the theme of love. ...

read more

5. Living with the Past: Tradition, Invention, and History

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 141-192

By the ninth book of his letters, Pliny seems obsessed by fama (fame). For Pliny, fama, unlike our fame, was not transient; it was his ticket to immortality, and in a world of transience his immortality was to be earned through literature. In a letter to Valerius Paulinus (IX 3), Pliny speaks of having “the prize of immortality before his eyes” ...

read more

6. Imperial Dreams: Being Roman in a World Empire

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 193-224

Throughout this book we have been exploring the relationship between the symbolic economy and individuals. We have searched for fissures and the incompleteness of symbolic economy, and looked at how that economy is restructured or even denied in a series of ‘scenes.’ ...

read more

7. Epilogue

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 225-230

This book is an experiment in reading without rules. We read across genres and, to a certain extent, across periods. We read in conjunction with texts of modernity, and texts of contemporary philosophy. We read open to connections and resonances. We read to explore texts which surprise and even shock. ...

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 231-240

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 241-247