Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 2-3

Contents

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pp. iii-5

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Acknowledgments

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pp. v-vii

I am indebted to numerous people who have provided much-needed intellectual engagement and sustenance during the time that I have worked on this project. First and foremost is Susan Hegeman, whose support and enthusiasm have been constant. I have been most fortunate to have her...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-24

Globalization, according to what has for some time become the conventional wisdom, refers to a radically new social, economic, and cultural reality in which all preexisting, locally constituted practices and ideas have ceased to be viable. Whether, as once proclaimed from the standpoint...

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Chapter 1. Management Fictions

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pp. 25-80

In his book Secular Vocations (1993), Bruce Robbins relates the following anecdote: “In the fall of 1972, when I was starting graduate school, the professor in charge of the first year colloquium asked us all what we would say if a businessman held a gun to our heads and demanded to...

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Chapter 2. (Im)migration and the New Nationalist Literatures

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pp. 81-139

Dislocalism in literary studies is a strategy that critics employ to produce a larger transnational context for various categories such as American literature or British literature—categories whose partial displacement is advocated only so as to solidify the nationalist category per se. In this...

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Chapter 3. American Sojourns

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pp. 140-169

“When travelers, old and young, get together and talk turns to their journeys, there is usually an argument put forward by the older ones that there was a time in the past—fifty, sixty years ago, though some say less—when this planet was ripe for travel. Then, the world was innocent,...

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Chapter 4. The Global Palate

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pp. 170-213

This chapter further extends my discussion, begun in chapters 2 and 3, regarding metaphors of mobility. In chapter 3 I analyzed the ways in which the rhetoric of the end of travel works “dislocally” precisely so as to preserve and consolidate the genre of travel writing, and reinscribe its...

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Conclusion. The “Turn to Fiction”—and “Fictional Capital”—Revisited

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pp. 215-233

The introduction to Dislocalism closes with a brief remark on a “general facet of dislocalism that has particular implications for the humanities and especially for literary/cultural studies” which I refer to as the “turn to fiction,” The latter, as very briefly outlined and previewed there, appears,...

Notes

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pp. 235-256

Bibliography

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pp. 257-272

Index

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pp. 273-303