Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 2-5

Contents

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pp. v-7

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Preface and Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-x

This book treats a moment in Roman cultural history that in the last decade or so has become one of the most contentious areas of discussion in classical scholarship. To put it rather simply, on the one side are those who insist on the primacy of literature as a category for understanding the earliest...

List of Abbreviations

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pp. xi-xii

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Chapter 1. Situating the Beginnings of Latin Prose

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pp. 1-37

In this study I take as a point of departure the fundamental claim of cultural studies that the production and consumption of culture are human practices characterized by relations of dominance and subjection. Far from aiming to disavow or sublate philological and literary analyses, I...

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Chapter 2. Under the Roman Sun: Poets, Rulers, Translations, and Power

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pp. 38-77

The most useful fact arising from the debate concerning the ‘invention of Latin literature’ is that the notion of a sudden fascination of an inferior (Roman) culture for a superior (Greek) one is no longer tenable. Not only does this notion rest upon a very essentialist understanding of...

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Chapter 3. Conflicting Scenarios: Conflicting Scenarios: Traffic in Others and Others’ Things

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pp. 78-116

In 168 B.C.E., following his victory at Pydna, Lucius Aemilius Paullus brought Macedonia under Roman rule. Plutarch reports that on that occasion the library of King Perseus was shipped to Rome and became the private possession of Paullus, who donated it to his sons.1 If we are to...

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Chapter 4. Inventing Latin Prose: Cato the Censor and the Formation of a New Aristocracy

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pp. 117-160

While the macro-system of economic and migratory circulation underwent changes as a consequence of military expansion, Rome earned the stature of a capital in part through the massive concentration of cultural commodities in the hands of its most affluent and powerful...

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Chapter 5. Power Differentials in Writing: Texts and Authority

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pp. 161-201

In the Brutus Cicero contends that oratory in Rome was late in its origin and development. Although he infers from episodes of the far past that certain men had achieved brilliant results thanks to their speaking abilities, Cicero remarks that he had never read that any of them was considered...

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Conclusion

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pp. 203-208

In many ways the ongoing debate over the early formation of Latin literature has done much to reveal the predicaments that derive from the ‘discursive’ make-up of concepts like authorship, text, literature, and genre. Methodologically, ‘discourse’ draws its force from the feeling...

Bibliography

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pp. 209-228

Index Locorum

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pp. 229-230

General Index

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pp. 231-239