Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-1

Title Page, Other Works in the Series, Copyright, Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 2-9

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-34

In the 1920s, the French commentator Georges Duhamel toured the United States, examining the state of a society that, particularly in light of the American role in the First World War, seemed to French eyes to represent the height of industrial and technological development, of efficiency and ingenuity, while embodying the most modern of social and sexual mores. ...

read more

1 - Between “the Virgin Forest and Modernism” : Techno-Primitive Hybrids in the Work of André Schaeffner and Robert Goffin

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 35-64

One of the central criticisms leveled by Jane Nardal in her 1928 article “Pantins exotiques” was that white French commentators were guilty of exploiting black musical forms in order symbolically to heal the rift between “the virgin forest and modernism,” as she put it ( J. Nardal 1928). Projecting their fantasies of both American machine-age modernity and African primitivism ...

read more

2 - Armstrong’s “Bitter Laughter” : Jazz, Gender, and Racial Politics in Léon-Gontran Damas’s Pigments (1937)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 65-89

Visitors to Paris in the interwar years were able to avail themselves of a handy tourist guide to the city’s black-run jazz and nightclubs. Entitled Bals nègres et bals pittoresques, the guide invited its implicitly white French readership to savor the sensual delights of Paris’s bals nègres. Helpful instructions were thus included directing the reader to the club that was “the most black” ...

read more

3 - Jazz as Antidote to the Machine Age: From Hugues Panassié to Léopold Sédar Senghor

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 90-125

In 1939, Léopold Sédar Senghor published an essay entitled “Ce que l’homme noir apporte” (What the Black Man Brings), in which he offered one of the first detailed expositions of his particular conception of négritude. Négritude, for Senghor, corresponded to a transatlantic black identity, which had been repressed by a long history of both Western imperialism and US racism. ...

read more

4 - “And What If Jazz Were French . . . ?” : Postcolonial Melancholy and Myths of French Louisiana in Vichy-Era France

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 126-154

In 1943, at the height of the Second World War, Panassié published a new book on jazz, entitled La Musique de jazz et le swing ( Jazz Music and Swing). At the end of the book, he included an “annexe” that was dedicated purely to criticizing a rival study that had appeared the previous year, André Coeuroy’s 1942 Histoire générale du jazz, strette, hot, swing ...

read more

5 - “Marvellous” Ellington: René Ménil, Jazz, Surrealism, and Creole Identity in Wartime Martinique

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 155-179

On 10 May 1943, Lieutenant De Vaisseau Bayle, a French naval officer and representative of the Vichy authorities in Martinique, wrote to the editors of Tropiques to explain that the publication of any further editions of the journal would henceforth be banned. Tropiques had been founded in Martinique in 1941 by a group of young French Antillean intellectuals, ...

read more

Coda: Jazz After Empire

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 180-200

In 1948, Jean-Paul Sartre published his famous essay “Orphée noir” (Black Orpheus) as the preface to Senghor’s anthology of poetry by the young poets of négritude. According to Sartre (1948, XVII), each of the poems included in the anthology bore witness to its author’s “quest” for a sense of black identity, ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 201-208

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 209-220

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 221-226