Cover

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pp. 1-1

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Title Page, About the Series, Other Works in the Series, Copyright, Acknowledgments

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pp. i-vi

It’s a little daunting to write a book about DOOM. There’s a mass of information out there, lovingly collated and compiled by an army of fans who have a vast knowledge about the game, and the challenge is doing justice to them as much as to the game itself. This book would simply not have been...

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Introduction: There Are a Lot of People Totally Opposed to Violence. They’re All Dead.

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pp. 1-5

It was early 1994, and the core, as I remember it, was me and my friends Tom and Andy. Tom was the one with the PC. We used to get together in his room in the halls of residence, with the lights off, and play this new game he’d just got. Usually, he was a freak for role-playing games—most recently,...

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1. Eva! Auf Wiedersehen!: The Birth of a Genre

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pp. 6-12

We need to consider the context into which DOOM arrived. The very first FPS game was Maze War, created by Steve Colley, Howard Palmer, and Greg Thompson (and other contributors) at the NASA Ames Research Center. Colley estimates that the first version was built during 1973,1 as an...

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2. The Speed of Light Sucks: The Rise of id

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pp. 13-19

The meteoric rise of id Software is the stuff of gaming legend, a larger-than- life tale of ambition, ego, and raw talent. In what is likely to remain the definitive book on early id, Masters of DOOM: How Two Guys Created an Empire and Transformed Pop Culture, Kushner (2003) argues that...

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3. Beefy Chunklets from Bible to Beta

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pp. 20-33

At the beginning of DOOM’s development, Tom Hall created a document to collect his thoughts and inform the design process. The DOOM Bible1 contains some basic design information such as endgame states, command-line prompts, lists of graphics and audio, and, at the end, press releases, a...

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4. The Fastest Texture Mapping in Town: id Tech 1

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pp. 34-44

The design of DOOM was creating level architectures the likes of which no one had ever seen, and these were resting on some groundbreaking technological foundations. The DOOM engine, id Tech 1, was responsible for pushing texture and lighting further than any previous PC engine and at a...

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5. DOOM by Numbers

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pp. 45-50

DOOM is a game of wonderful simplicity in many dimensions, not just story and gameplay. The entire first episode, Knee Deep in the Dead, contains just six monsters, one of which only appears in the very final level, in a kind of boss battle. All of DOOM’s monsters are defined by a number of...

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6. A Soundtrack for Mayhem

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pp. 51-55

Bobby Prince, DOOM’s composer and audio wizard, had been working with id since the Keen days, picking up the job via Scott Miller. This early work was notable for two things. First, it was conducted largely in the dark. Prince told me, “We did a lot of our contact by long distance . . . by them...

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7. All Hell Breaks Loose: Launch, Sales, and Critical Reception

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pp. 56-63

We’re nearly ready to take a stroll through Hell and hit the game in detail, but before we do that, we need to look at what happened on December 10, 1993, the day that (to hijack W. B. Yeats) a “rough beast, its hour come round at last,” slouched onto the University of Wisconsin’s FTP system to be...

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8. A “Shot-by-Shot” Analysis of DOOM, Part 1: Knee Deep in the Dead

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pp. 64-80

You’re standing in some kind of entrance hall. There are open windows, and you can see mountains in the distance. There’s a carpet area, a barrel. Out of a hole in the wall to the right, you can see a courtyard with a pool of green gunk in which there’s a glowing armor suit. Off to the left, an antechamber...

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9. A “Shot-by-Shot” Analysis of DOOM, Part 2: The Shores of Hell

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pp. 81-97

A bunch of text appearing one character at a time over a tiled metal background is not pretty, even making allowances for it being 1993. But, then, it never really was about a glamorous final cutscene. There’s a whole new episode to get through, and we’re leaving behind Romero’s tightly packed,...

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10. A “Shot-by-Shot” Analysis of DOOM, Part 3: Inferno

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pp. 98-112

Back to the mayhem for the final push. We left our hero rappelling down from suspended Deimos Base to the floors of Hell itself, with a short and bloody stroll through its corridors and halls toward an exit back to normality if we’re lucky. Inferno, the third episode of DOOM is Sandy Petersen’s work...

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11. Endgame: Why DOOM Is a Masterpiece of Game Design

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pp. 113-117

First, we get the scrolling text out of the way. Apparently, the Spiderdemon was the mastermind behind the whole invasion thing but has “had its ass kicked for all time.” Escaping through a hidden doorway, we are magically transported back to Earth, “too tough for Hell to contain,” and are left to...

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12. A Handful of Vertebrae and a Headful of Mad: Modding DOOM

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pp. 118-128

Back in 1994, even a diehard Mac fanboy like my older brother had got hooked and was moonlighting on a different platform. I remember him grabbing me one evening after the pub and telling me I wasn’t going to believe what he’d just downloaded. Someone out there had gone one better...

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13. Not if I Frag You First: DOOM Multiplayer

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pp. 129-137

Shooting Zombies is fun, right? What could be more fun than dancing the chaingun cha-cha with a roomful of the undead? The answer is simple: shooting your boss; standing behind your friends just waiting, patiently, until they turn around, then letting them have a full plasma clip to the head;...

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14. Fucked in the Dark: Ports, Sequels, and Other Unholy Offspring

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pp. 138-150

Between the release in late 1993 of the original version and the release of DOOM II in October 1994, id kept up a steady stream of patches and updates to the game, fixing problems and adding features. Key updates for us are 1.2 (February 1994), which added modem support and the Nightmare...

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15. You Gibbed It Here First: DOOM as the Prototypical FPS Game

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pp. 151-164

We’ve already seen that DOOM came off the back of a history of first-person gaming that stretches right back to the inception of games as a medium. We can also see the emerging form of the title in the development of the technology and the “prototype” id games of Catacomb 3D, Hovertank 3D,...

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16. SCARY DARKFAST: The Legacy of DOOM

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pp. 165-168

The demons have not gone far, as it turns out. The bottom line is that games are evolving more rapidly than any other medium on the planet right now. However, if FPS games have, in many aspects, gone beyond the template DOOM established, it doesn’t mean they owe that game any less of a debt....

Notes

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pp. 169-174

Glossary

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pp. 175-177

References

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pp. 179-181

Further Reading

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pp. 183-184

Index

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pp. 185-189