Up in the Air

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. 2-7

Contents

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pp. 8-9

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Preface

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pp. ix-xi

We hope that this book will make a contribution to practice as well as to scholarship. The book was made possible by the international research net-work of the Labor and Employment Relations Association’s Airline Industry Council, and in particular by an excellent group of academic colleagues from around the world. We draw on the work of many of them in the book ...

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1. Low-Cost Competition in the Airline Industry

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pp. 1-14

These words from a front- page story in the December 22, 2007, issue of the New York Times should serve as a wake- up call to all those responsible for America’s air transportation system: “And you thought the passengers were mad. . . . Airline employees are fed up, too—with pay cuts, increased work-loads and management’s miserly ways, which leave workers to explain to ...

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2. Developments in the U.S. Airline Industry

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pp. 15-27

Labor relations in the U.S. airline industry have often been a high- stakes enterprise. The national interest in airlines was recognized in the 1930s just as the industry was getting off the ground. After lobbying by the Air Line Pi lots Association (ALPA), in 1936 the federal government brought airlines under the same labor law, the Railway Labor Act (RLA), that governs rail-...

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3. Developments in the Airline Industry in Other Countries

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pp. 28-60

To what extent have airline managers, union leaders, and policymakers in other countries tried different approaches to competitive and employment- relations strategies? Are the volatility and innovation in the U.S. airline industry exceptional or are the strategies chosen in other countries’ airlines con-verging on U.S. patterns? What might policymakers and others in the United ...

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4. Industry Trends in Costs, Productivity, Quality, and Morale

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pp. 61-85

The growth of low- cost competition initiated by new entrants and the other changes introduced by legacy airlines in the early years of the twenty-first century are transforming the airline industry in fundamental ways. In this chapter we summarize a large body of data to take stock of the results of this transformation. Our focus is on variations and changes in costs, productivity, ...

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5. Alternative Strategies for New Entrants: Southwest vs. Ryanair

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pp. 86-123

New- entrant airlines that compete on costs are transforming the global airline industry. Their low-cost competitive strategies are the most visible part of their impact. Although less visible, their employment- relations strategies are also transforming the industry. This chapter considers the variations in the employment-relations strategies we observed among new entrants in the ...

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6. The Legacy Responses: Alternative Approaches

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pp. 124-166

One industry insider referred to legacy airlines as “dinosaurs.” But unlike the dinosaurs, the legacies are certainly not extinct. Many of them are reinventing themselves. Although new entrants have become an increasingly significant segment of the airline industry, most of the industry’s revenue, passengers, and employees are still generated, flown, and employed by large legacy airlines. ...

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7. Building a More Balanced Airline Industry

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pp. 167-197

The global airline industry is undergoing a transformation driven by in-creased price competition that has arisen from three interrelated forces: deregulation of product markets, the growth of new lower- cost entrants, and increasing customer price sensitivity. Older legacy carriers have responded by dramatically cutting labor costs in an effort to close the cost and price gap ...

Notes

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pp. 199-213

Index

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pp. 215-222