Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. 2-9

Contents

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pp. 10-11

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-13

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-15

My thanks go to the following: Alice Birney, Literary Manuscript Historian of the Library of Congress, for assisting in the discovery and photocopying of scripts Elizabeth E. Fuller, librarian at the Rosenbach Museum and Library, Philadelphia, and her staff for assisting in my research and for ...

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Introduction

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pp. xv-xxviii

BY 1924, MERCEDES DE ACOSTA, who was then only thirty-one years of age, had clearly established herself as an author on the move. She had published three volumes of poetry—Moods (1920), Archways of Life (1921), Streets and Shadows (1924)—a novel entitled Wind Chaff (1920), and a one-act play about World War I called For France (1917).1 The haunting quality of her imagery ...

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Jehanne d’Arc

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pp. 1-44

There is no scenery in this play. A glorious blue cyclorama is used throughout the entire play regardless of the change of properties. The stage is built architecturally upon planes or inclines, upstage being the highest of all. This remains as a permanent structure during the entire play and is painted, together with the ®oor, the same color blue as the cyclorama. Different ...

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Jacob Slovak

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pp. 45-94

A small town in New England. The ¤rst act takes place in the parlor– dining room in the New England farm house of Josiah Flint. It is about ¤ve o’clock of a Sunday afternoon in winter. Upstage, slightly to the right of the center, the front door is placed. Right of door there is a mirror and some pegs with coats, caps, and muf®ers hanging from them. Directly ...

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The Mother of Christ

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pp. 95-118

A room in MARY'S house. It is 9 o’clock at night. The room is extremely simple and in the style used in the poorer homes of Palestine. The walls (which are cracked from age in many places) are made of plaster tinted in blue, which has faded almost to white. The ®oor is earth. The room is small. A door which leads to the street stands upstage to the left. This door is closed. ...

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World Without End

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pp. 119-154

The setting is ROMOLA CHARRINGTON'S country home in England, a lovely old English house—mellowed by age and tradition. It is placed to the right of stage, with a brick terrace stretching out onto lawn. A huge tree grows in the center of the garden with masses of ®owers. Garden chairs are scattered about, and cooling drinks are on a table. To left of stage a box-hedge ...

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The Dark Light

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pp. 155-197

Early in September of the present time. The living room in the house of SVANHILD STRANDENES in a remote spot on the west coast of Norway. The room is comfortable and in taste. The walls are paneled a soft green. On the ®oor there is a deep brown rug. To the right there is a ¤replace with a lounge drawn up before it. To the left there is a large table with a soft ...

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Illusion

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pp. 198-252

A rough cabaret dive in Vancouver, frequented mostly by seamen. It is after midnight but still too early for the place to assume any life. The room is rather small with a low ceiling. Directly right upstage there is a swinging door, such as used in the old-time saloon. This door opens onto an alleyway. Almost to the middle of stage, directly upstage but a little to the left, there is a bar. In the corner to the left there is a platform. On the platform is a piano, three chairs and two music stands. ...

Back Cover

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pp. 286-286