In this Book

buy this book Buy This Book in Print
summary
In February 2003, an undocumented immigrant teen from Mexico lay dying in a prominent American hospital due to a stunning medical oversight--she had received a heart-lung transplantation of the wrong blood type. In the following weeks, Jesica Santillan's tragedy became a portal into the complexities of American medicine, prompting contentious debate about new patterns and old problems in immigration, the hidden epidemic of medical error, the lines separating transplant "haves" from "have-nots," the right to sue, and the challenges posed by "foreigners" crossing borders for medical care. This volume draws together experts in history, sociology, medical ethics, communication and immigration studies, transplant surgery, anthropology, and health law to understand the dramatic events, the major players, and the core issues at stake. Contributors view the Santillan story as a morality tale: about the conflicting values underpinning American health care; about the politics of transplant medicine; about how a nation debates deservedness, justice, and second chances; and about the global dilemmas of medical tourism and citizenship. Contributors: Charles Bosk, University of Pennsylvania Leo R. Chavez, University of California, Irvine Richard Cook, University of Chicago Thomas Diflo, New York University Medical Center Jason Eberl, Indiana University@-Purdue University Indianapolis Jed Adam Gross, Yale University Jacklyn Habib, American Association of Retired Persons Tyler R. Harrison, Purdue University Beatrix Hoffman, Northern Illinois University Nancy M. P. King, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Barron Lerner, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health Susan E. Lederer, Yale University Julie Livingston, Rutgers University Eric M. Meslin, Indiana University School of Medicine and Indiana University@-Purdue University Indianapolis Susan E. Morgan, Purdue University Nancy Scheper-Hughes, University of California, Berkeley Rosamond Rhodes, Mount Sinai School of Medicine and The Graduate Center, City University of New York Carolyn Rouse, Princeton University Karen Salmon, New England School of Law Lesley Sharp, Barnard and Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health Lisa Volk Chewning, Rutgers University Keith Wailoo, Rutgers University This collection of essays provides a multidisciplinary conversation about Jesica Santillan, the undocumented immigrant teen who died after receiving a heart transplant of the wrong blood type. Contributors from the fields of history, sociology, surgery, ethics, anthropology, media, and law offer differing perspectives on common themes that give a cohesive structure to the collection. In sixteen essays, they discuss the promise and problems of high-tech medicine, tort reform and malpractice suits, distribution of scarce resources, personal and systemic errors in health care, and the impact of highly publicized media dramas. Without placing blame, the essayists seek to understand the events and issues as played out in key locales and practices: in hospitals wary of committing errors, in transplant procedures concerned with timely delivery of organs, in print and broadcast media bent on satisfying public interest in stories of life-saving medicine or medical scandal, and in the global turn toward medical tourism. In February 2003, an undocumented immigrant teen from Mexico lay dying in a prominent American hospital due to a stunning medical oversight--she had received a heart-lung transplantation of the wrong blood type. In the following weeks, Jesica Santillan's tragedy became a portal into the complexities of American medicine, prompting contentious debate about new patterns and old problems in immigration, the hidden epidemic of medical error, the lines separating transplant "haves" from "have-nots," the right to sue, and the challenges posed by "foreigners" crossing borders for medical care. This volume draws together experts in history, sociology, medical ethics, communication and immigration studies, transplant surgery, anthropology, and health law to understand the dramatic events, the major players, and the core issues at stake. In February 2003, an undocumented immigrant teen from Mexico lay dying in a prominent American hospital due to a stunning medical oversight--she had received a heart-lung transplantation of the wrong blood type. In the following weeks, Jesica Santillan's tragedy became a portal into the complexities of American medicine, prompting contentious debate about new patterns and old problems in immigration, the hidden epidemic of medical error, the lines separating transplant "haves" from "have-nots," the right to sue, and the challenges posed by "foreigners" crossing borders for medical care. This volume draws together experts in history, sociology, medical ethics, communication and immigration studies, transplant surgery, anthropology, and health law to understand the dramatic events, the major players, and the core issues at stake. Contributors view the Santillan story as a morality tale: about the conflicting values underpinning American health care; about the politics of transplant medicine; about how a nation debates deservedness, justice, and second chances; and about the global dilemmas of medical tourism and citizenship. Contributors: Charles Bosk, University of Pennsylvania Leo R. Chavez, University of California, Irvine Richard Cook, University of Chicago Thomas Diflo, New York University Medical Center Jason Eberl, Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis Jed Adam Gross, Yale University Jacklyn Habib, American Association of Retired Persons Tyler R. Harrison, Purdue University Beatrix Hoffman, Northern Illinois University Nancy M. P. King, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Barron Lerner, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health Susan E. Lederer, Yale University Julie Livingston, Rutgers University Eric M. Meslin, Indiana University School of Medicine and Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis Susan E. Morgan, Purdue University Nancy Scheper-Hughes, University of California, Berkeley Rosamond Rhodes, Mount Sinai School of Medicine and The Graduate Center, City University of New York Carolyn Rouse, Princeton University Karen Salmon, New England School of Law Lesley Sharp, Barnard and Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health Lisa Volk Chewning, Rutgers University Keith Wailoo, Rutgers University

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. 1-1
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. 2-5
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-viii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Introduction: Chronicles of an Accidental Death
  2. pp. 1-16
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part I. Medical Error and the American Transplant Theater
  2. pp. 17-18
  1. America’s Angel or Thieving Immigrant?: Media Coverage, the Santillan Story, and Publicized Ambivalence toward Donation and Transplantation
  2. pp. 19-45
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Hobson’s Choices: Matching and Mismatching in Transplantation Work Processes
  2. pp. 46-69
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. The Transplant Surgeon’s Perspective on the Bungled Transplant
  2. pp. 70-81
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. From Libby Zion to Jesica Santillan: Many Truths
  2. pp. 82-96
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. All Things Twice, First Tragedy Then Farce: Lessons from a Transplant Error
  2. pp. 97-116
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part II. Justice and Second Chances Across the Border
  2. pp. 117-118
  1. The Politics of Second Chances: Waste, Futility, and the Debate over Jesica’s Second Transplant
  2. pp. 119-141
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Tucker’s Heart: Racial Politics and Heart Transplantation in America
  2. pp. 142-157
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Justice in Organ Allocation
  2. pp. 158-179
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Playing with Matches without Getting Burned: Public Confidence in Organ Allocation
  2. pp. 180-204
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Consuming Differences: Post-Human Ethics, Global (In)justice, and the Transplant Trade in Organs
  2. pp. 205-234
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part III. Citizens and Foreigners/Eligibility and Exclusion
  2. pp. 235-236
  1. Sympathy and Exclusion: Access to Health Care for Undocumented Immigrants in the United States
  2. pp. 237-254
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Eligibility for Organ Transplantation to Foreign Nationals: The Relationship between Citizenship, Justice, and Philanthropy as Policy Criteria
  2. pp. 255-275
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Imagining the Nation, Imagining Donor Recipients: Jesica Santillan and the Public Discourse of Belonging
  2. pp. 276-296
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part IV. Speaking for Jesica
  2. pp. 297-298
  1. Babes and Baboons: Jesica Santillan and Experimental Pediatric Transplant Research in America
  2. pp. 299-328
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Jesica Speaks?: Adolescent Consent for Transplantation and Ethical Uncertainty
  2. pp. 329-348
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Fame and Fortune: The ‘‘Simple’’ Ethics of Organ Transplantation
  2. pp. 349-360
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. 361-362
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 363-368
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 369-378
  3. restricted access Download |

Additional Information

ISBN
9781469605432
Related ISBN
9780807830598
MARC Record
OCLC
793526643
Pages
392
Launched on MUSE
2014-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.