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Pauli Murray and Caroline Ware
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In 1942 Pauli Murray, a young black woman from North Carolina studying law at Howard University, visited a constitutional law class taught by Caroline Ware, one of the nation's leading historians. A friendship and a correspondence began, lasting until Murray's death in 1985. Ware, a Boston Brahmin born in 1899, was a scholar, a leading consumer advocate, and a political activist. Murray, born in 1910 and raised in North Carolina, with few resources except her intelligence and determination, graduated from college at 16 and made her way to law school, where she organized student sit-ins to protest segregation. She pulled her friend Ware into this early civil rights activism. Their forty-year correspondence ranged widely over issues of race, politics, international affairs, and--for a difficult period in the 1950s--McCarthyism. In time, Murray became a labor lawyer, a university professor, and the first black woman to be ordained an Episcopal priest. Ware continued her work as a social historian and consumer advocate while pursuing an international career as a community development specialist. Their letters, products of high intelligence and a gift for writing, offer revealing portraits of their authors as well as the workings of an unusual female friendship. They also provide a wonderful channel into the social and political thought of the times, particularly regarding civil rights and women's rights. This collection of letters documents the 40- year interracial friendship between writer Pauli Murray and historian Caroline Ware, both of whom were considered radical feminists at the time. Ware (1899-1990) was a Boston Brahmin with a Harvard Ph.D. who taught history and social work for two decades at Howard University and later became an adviser in community development & cultural affairs for the UN. Murray (1910-1985), who was biracial (African American and Cherokee), was raised by her aunt and grandparents in Durham, NC, graduated high school at 16 and earned her law degree from Howard, where she was a student of Ware. She became a labor lawyer, teacher, activist, poet, and writer, best known for her family memoir, Proud Shoes (1956). The correspondence is at times personal, sometimes political, and covers such topics as the civil rights movement, electoral politics, the labor movement, the debate about Fair Employment Practices, McCarthyism, feminism, NOW, as well as everyday struggles and triumphs. Strip & rebind: 1000 Cloth sales: 553 Cloth inventory: 1203 Recommendation for cloth edition: OP/OS Caroline Ware (1899-1990), a white historian, was a leading consumer advocate and a political activist. Pauli Murray (1910-1985), was an African American student of Ware's at Howard University who went on to become a labor lawyer, a university professor, and the first black woman to be ordained an Episcopal priest. The women shared a life-long friendship, and their forty-year correspondence ranges widely over issues of race, politics, international affairs, and McCarthyism. The letters, products of high intelligence and a gift for writing, reveal portraits of their authors as well as the workings of an unusual female friendship. They also provide a wonderful channel into the social and political thought of the times, particularly regarding civil rights and women's rights. In 1942 Pauli Murray, a young black woman from North Carolina studying law at Howard University, visited a constitutional law class taught by Caroline Ware, one of the nation's leading historians. A friendship and a correspondence began, lasting until Murray's death in 1985. Ware, a Boston Brahmin born in 1899, was a scholar, a leading consumer advocate, and a political activist. Murray, born in 1910 and raised in North Carolina, with few resources except her intelligence and determination, graduated from college at 16 and made her way to law school, where she organized student sit-ins to protest segregation. She pulled her friend Ware into this early civil rights activism. Their forty-year correspondence ranged widely over issues of race, politics, international affairs, and--for a difficult period in the 1950s--McCarthyism. In time, Murray became a labor lawyer, a university professor, and the first black woman to be ordained an Episcopal priest. Ware continued her work as a social historian and consumer advocate while pursuing an international career as a community development specialist. Their letters, products of high intelligence and a gift for writing, offer revealing portraits of their authors as well as the workings of an unusual female friendship. They also provide a wonderful channel into the social and political thought of the times, particularly regarding civil rights and women's rights.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. 1-1
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. 2-7
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-9
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. ix-xiii
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-22
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  1. Chapter 1. The Correspondence Begins
  2. pp. 23-50
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  1. Chapter 2. The Cold War, McCarthyism, and Civil Rights
  2. pp. 51-91
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  1. Chapter 3. Family History, Global History
  2. pp. 92-112
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  1. Photographs
  2. pp. 130-135
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  1. Chapter 4. Ghana, UNESCO, and Beyond
  2. pp. 113-139
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  1. Chapter 5. Writing, Editing, and Brandeis
  2. pp. 140-161
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  1. Chapter 6. The Last Phase
  2. pp. 162-170
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  1. Appendix
  2. pp. 171-180
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  1. A Personal Postscript
  2. pp. 181-188
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. 189-190
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 191-194
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