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Ashbel P. Fitch
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summary
The concept of an "honest Tammany man" sounds like an oxymoron, but it became a reality in the curious career of Ashbel P. Fitch, who served New York City as a four-term congressman and a one-term city comptroller during the late nineteenth century. Although little known today, Fitch was well respected in his own day and played a pivotal role on both national and local stages. In the U.S. Congress, Fitch was a passionate advocate of New York City. His support of tariff reform and his efforts to have New York City chosen as the site for an 1892 World Exposition reflected his deep interest in issues of industrialization and urbanization. An ardent defender of immigrant rights, Fitch opposed the xenophobia of the times and championed cosmopolitan diversity. As New York’s comptroller, he oversaw the city’s finances during a time of terrible economic distress, withstanding threats from Tammany Hall on one side and from Mayor William L. Strong’s misguided reform administration on the other. In Ashbel P. Fitch, Remington succeeds in illuminating the independence and integrity of this unsung hero against the backdrop of the Gilded Age’s corrupt politics and fierce party loyalty.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Illustrations
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Foreword
  2. pp. xi-xii
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. xiii-xv
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  1. Fitch and Parmelee Ancestry
  2. p. xvii
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-10
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  1. 1. Forebears and Early Years, 1848–1885
  2. pp. 11-33
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  1. 2. Politics and the Road to Washington
  2. pp. 34-51
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  1. 3. National Prominence, Tariff Speech: Fiftieth Congress, 1886–1888
  2. pp. 52-74
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  1. 4. New York’s World’s Fair Lost: Fifty-first Congress, 1888–1890
  2. pp. 75-91
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  1. 5. Republican Overreach, Democratic Momentum: Fifty-first Congress, 1888–1890
  2. pp. 92-103
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  1. 6. Silver Beckons: Fifty-second Congress, 1890–1892
  2. pp. 104-119
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  1. 7. New York and the Election Law in Cleveland’s Victory: Fifty-second Congress, 1890–1892
  2. pp. 120-139
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  1. 8. Repeal of the Election Law and Sherman Act: Fifty-third Congress, 1892–1894
  2. pp. 140-148
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  1. 9. New York City’s Watershed
  2. pp. 149-169
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  1. 10. Reformers in Charge, 1895
  2. pp. 170-197
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  1. 11. A Crash and a Bang
  2. pp. 198-218
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  1. 12. Silver and the New York Elections of 1896 and 1897
  2. pp. 219-242
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  1. 13. Passage
  2. pp. 243-253
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  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 254-257
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  1. Appendix A: Letter from Ashbel Fitsch to Cornelius van Cott, November 27, 1887
  2. pp. 261-263
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  1. Appendix B: Speech of Hon. Ashbel P. Fitch in the House of Representatives, Monday, May 16, 1888
  2. pp. 265-270
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  1. Appendix C: Speech of Hon. Ashbel P. Fitch in the House of Representatives, Monday, October 9, 1893
  2. pp. 271-277
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 279-315
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 317-319
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  1. Index [Includes Back Cover]
  2. pp. 321-331
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