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Beyond the Founders
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In pursuit of a more sophisticated and inclusive American history, the contributors to ###Beyond the Founders# propose new directions for the study of the political history of the republic before the Civil War. In ways formal and informal, symbolic and tactile, this political world encompassed blacks, women, entrepreneurs, and Native Americans, as well as the Adamses, Jeffersons, and Jacksons, all struggling in their own ways to shape the new nation and express their ideas of American democracy. Taking inspiration from the new cultural and social histories, these political historians show that the early history of the United States was not just the product of a few "founding fathers," but was also marked by widespread and passionate popular involvement; print media more politically potent than that of later eras; and political conflicts and influences that crossed lines of race, gender, and class. Contributors: John L. Brooke, The Ohio State University Andrew R. L. Cayton, Miami University (Ohio) Saul Cornell, The Ohio State University Seth Cotlar, Willamette University Reeve Huston, Duke University Nancy Isenberg, University of Tulsa Richard R. John, University of Illinois at Chicago Albrecht Koschnik, Florida State University Rich Newman, Rochester Institute of Technology Jeffrey L. Pasley, University of Missouri, Columbia Andrew W. Robertson, City University of New York William G. Shade, Lehigh University David Waldstreicher, Temple University Rosemarie Zagarri, George Mason University Arguing for a more sophisticated and inclusive political history of early America than recent scholarship has provided, the editors have collected 14 original essays that employ the methods of social and cultural history to propose new directions for the study of the American republic before 1830. The essays are grouped into 4 main subjects: popular and democratic political practices; the role of race, gender, and social identities; the creation of norms and forms of political expression; and the importance of early public interest movements and parties. Together, they show that the early political history of the U.S. was not just the product of a few founding elites but was also marked by widespread and passionate popular involvement; an emerging print media; and conflict along race, gender, & class lines. These 14 original essays show that the early political history of the U.S. was not just the product of a few founding elites but was also marked by widespread and passionate popular involvement; an emerging print media; and conflict along race, gender, & class lines. In pursuit of a more sophisticated and inclusive American history, the contributors to ###Beyond the Founders# propose new directions for the study of the political history of the republic before the Civil War. In ways formal and informal, symbolic and tactile, this political world encompassed blacks, women, entrepreneurs, and Native Americans, as well as the Adamses, Jeffersons, and Jacksons, all struggling in their own ways to shape the new nation and express their ideas of American democracy. Taking inspiration from the new cultural and social histories, these political historians show that the early history of the United States was not just the product of a few "founding fathers," but was also marked by widespread and passionate popular involvement; print media more politically potent than that of later eras; and political conflicts and influences that crossed lines of race, gender, and class. Contributors: John L. Brooke, The Ohio State University Andrew R. L. Cayton, Miami University (Ohio) Saul Cornell, The Ohio State University Seth Cotlar, Willamette University Reeve Huston, Duke University Nancy Isenberg, University of Tulsa Richard R. John, University of Illinois at Chicago Albrecht Koschnik, Florida State University Rich Newman, Rochester Institute of Technology Jeffrey L. Pasley, University of Missouri, Columbia Andrew W. Robertson, City University of New York William G. Shade, Lehigh University David Waldstreicher, Temple University Rosemarie Zagarri, George Mason University

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. 1-1
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. 2-7
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  1. Contents, Illustrations
  2. pp. vii-x
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xi-xii
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  1. Introduction: Beyond the Founders
  2. pp. 1-28
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  1. Part I.: Democracy and Other Practices
  2. pp. 29-30
  1. 1. The Cheese and the Words: Popular Political Culture and Participatory Democracy in the Early American Republic
  2. pp. 31-56
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  1. 2. Voting Rites and Voting Acts: Electioneering Ritual, 1790–1820
  2. pp. 57-78
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  1. 3. Why Thomas Jefferson and African Americans Wore Their Politics on Their Sleeves: Dress and Mobilization between American Revolutions
  2. pp. 79-104
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  1. Part II: Gender, Race, and Other Identities
  2. pp. 105-106
  1. 4. Women and Party Conflict in the Early Republic
  2. pp. 107-128
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  1. 5. The ‘‘Little Emperor’’: Aaron Burr, Dandyism, and the Sexual Politics of Treason
  2. pp. 129-158
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  1. 6. Young Federalists, Masculinity, and Partisanship during the War of 1812
  2. pp. 159-179
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  1. 7. Protest in Black and White: The Formation and Transformation of an African American Political Community during the Early Republic
  2. pp. 180-204
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  1. Part III: Norms and Forms
  2. pp. 205-206
  1. 8. Consent, Civil Society, and the Public Sphere in the Age of Revolution and the Early American Republic
  2. pp. 207-250
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  1. 9. Beyond the Myth of Consensus: The Struggle to Define the Right to Bear Arms in the Early Republic
  2. pp. 251-273
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  1. 10. The Federalists’ Transatlantic Cultural Offensive of 1798 and the Moderation of American Democratic Discourse
  2. pp. 274-300
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  1. Part IV: Interests, Spaces, and Other Structures
  2. pp. 301-302
  1. 11. Continental Politics: Liberalism, Nationalism, and the Appeal of Texas in the 1820s
  2. pp. 303-327
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  1. 12. Private Enterprise, Public Good?: Communications Deregulation as a National Political Issue, 1839–1851
  2. pp. 328-354
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  1. 13. Popular Movements and Party Rule: The New York Anti-Rent Wars and the Jacksonian Political Order
  2. pp. 355-386
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  1. 14. Commentary: Déjà Vu All Over Again: Is There a New New Political History?
  2. pp. 387-412
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 413-416
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 417-435
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