Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 2-7

Contents, Illustrations

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pp. vii-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

My scholarly interest in Eric Williams began in 1994, when the University of North Carolina Press invited me to write a new introduction to Capitalism and Slavery on the occasion of its republication. In subsequent years I conducted research in the Public Record Office in London, the Eric Williams Memorial Collection (EWMC) in St. Augustine, Trinidad, ...

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Introduction

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pp. 5-14

"The circumstances of my birth were quite unremarkable," Eric Eustace Williams wrote in the unpublished version of his memoir. "They," asserted Williams, "in no way differed from those of other West Indian children of the lower middle class." The year was 1911, the month was September. ...

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Chapter 1. Intellectual Decolonization

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pp. 15-39

"The history of our West Indian islands can be expressed in two simple words: Columbus and Sugar," Eric Williams proclaimed in a lecture he delivered at the Trinidad Public Library on April 19,1944. As he awaited the publication of Capitalism and Slavery later that year, the young historian was preparing the ground for the reception of its bitter assault on colonialism. ...

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Chapter 2. The Challenge of Political and Economic Integration

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pp. 40-75

Norman Manley, the premier of Jamaica, delivered a major broadcast to the people of Trinidad and Tobago on June 17,1960. The newly inaugurated West Indies Federation was experiencing difficult times, and Manley was assuring his audience and the rest of the region that the federation would prevail and that it was in the best interest of the islands to remain united. ...

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Chapter 3. The Struggle for Chaguaramas

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pp. 76-137

Nothing could temper the enthusiasm and determination of the crowd, not even the torrential showers that drenched it on that warm April morning in 1960. Some sixty thousand strong, it was the largest march that Trinidad and Tobago had ever seen. The banners held high by some told the entire story: "Dignity Is Incompatible with Colonialism," read one. ...

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Chapter 4. Eric Williams and the Golden Handshake

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pp. 138-178

The letter was not entirely unexpected. Still, its arrival on Harold MacMillan's desk on that November day in 1962 created a high degree of annoyance. "Dear Prime Minister" the letter opened coldly, a pointed departure from the more fraternal salutation, "My dear Prime Minister," that had graced earlier communications. ...

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Chapter 5. Courting Grenada

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pp. 179-197

"One from ten leaves nought," declared the premier of Trinidad and Tobago when the Jamaican electorate voted to secede from the West Indies Federation on September 19, 1961.1 Eric Williams's command of arithmetic, at least in this instance, was questionable, but the political implications of his comment were unmistakable. ...

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Chapter 6. Bleeding Guiana

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pp. 198-234

Situated on the northeastern coast of South America, British Guiana was the largest of the Anglophone Caribbean colonies. Its area of 83,000 square miles made it slightly smaller than the British Isles. In 1965 its population numbered only 605,000 and was concentrated in Georgetown, the capital city, and on the coastal belt. ...

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Chapter 7. Eric Williams, Africa, and Africans

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pp. 235-254

Fresh from a six-week tour of eleven African states, Prime Minister Eric Williams addressed one of his favorite audiences on April 22, 1964. It consisted mainly of West Indian students at McGill and Sir George Williams Universities in Montreal who had gathered to hear the former professor discuss his tour, ...

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Chapter 8. The Economics and Politics of Race

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pp. 255-303

Eric Williams always boasted about Trinidad and Tobago's ethnic diversity. To him, the two islands comprised the most distinctive Caribbean peoples. Writing in 1964, he characterized the new nation as "the most cosmopolitan of all the West Indian territories—its African stock having been supplemented in the last century ...

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Epilogue

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pp. 304-308

Brilliant, brash, confident, buoyant and energetic, Eric Eustace Williams burst into the political arena of Trinidad and Tobago in 1956. He was fresh and idealistic when many other contestants, such as Tubal Uriah Butler and Albert Gomes, had seen better years and were visibly tired. ...

Notes

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pp. 309-334

Bibliography

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pp. 335-338

Index

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pp. 339-354