Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 2-7

Contents

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pp. 8-9

Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xi

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Introduction

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pp. 1-10

"Long may it remain, a monument to the refinement and piety of an age and a generation that have long passed ...

PART I: Constructing Material Religion

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pp. 11-25

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1. The City Churches

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pp. 13-56

In June 1753 the Gentleman’s Magazine published an engraving of the west prospect of “St. Philip’s Church in Charles Town, South ...

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2. The Diversity of Countries, Times, and Men’s Manners

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pp. 57-111

Sheltered in long stretches by a canopy of live oak trees and Spanish moss, U.S. Highway 61 follows an ancient path northwest from Charleston toward the rice plantations that once lined the Ashley River. About twelve miles out ...

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3. Builders and Building Culture

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pp. 113-138

Positioned above the chancel window of St. Stephen’s Parish Church is a curious signature, two perpendicular bricks inscribed with fine lime mortar (FIG. 3.1). The horizontal brick ...

PART II: Belief and Ritual in Material Religion

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pp. 139-153

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4. Sensing the Sacred

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pp. 141-174

Not long after the death of her nineteen-year-old son Benjamin on January 17, 1718, Sarah Seabrook sent for a stone to mark his grave near their church in the South Carolina plantation parish of St. ...

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5. The Sacramental Body

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pp. 175-215

A diminutive but graceful white marble baptismal basin once stood in the small chapel now called Pompion Hill ...

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6. The Beauty of Holiness

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pp. 217-249

A large venetian window illumines the shallow semicircular and arched chancel of Charleston’s St. Michael’s Church (1752–61) (FIG. 6.1). While the decorative stenciling, Tiffany window, and other ornamental work dates ...

PART III: Material Religion and Social Practice

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pp. 251-265

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7. Carolina in Ye West Indies

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pp. 253-278

Not far from the strip malls of South Carolina Highway 52 stands an ancient church still protected from suburban sprawl by a sheltering wood (FIG. 7.1). An architectural frontispiece of pilasters, entablature, and pediment surrounds ...

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8. Anglican Architecture and Civic Order

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pp. 279-308

Against a field of deep black, the gilt and oversized Roman numerals of the steeple clock of St. Michael’s blaze forth in the bright light of the Carolina sun (FIG. 8.1). Easily visible from the street below, the numbers ring the ...

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9. Pulpits, Pews, and Power

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pp. 309-329

In the summer of 1744, the vestry of St. John’s, Colleton, included in the pages of their minutes a plan of their newly completed church (FIGS. 9.1 and 9.2). The nave of the church was organized around three aisles, two extending from ...

PART IV: Revolutionary Changes to Material Religion

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pp. 331-345

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10. Building the “Holy City”

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pp. 333-364

A few weeks before Easter in 1789, the vestry of St. John’s, Colleton County, convened at their parish church (FIG. 10.1). Upon inspection, they found the church “in a most deplorable situation, indeed not a door, window ...

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Conclusion

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pp. 365-368

The Beauty of Holiness reads the architecture and decorative arts of Anglicanism in colonial South Carolina as a material record of the complexities of eighteenth-century religious practice and belief. Between the fervency of ...

Appendixes

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pp. 369-386

Notes

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pp. 387-445

Bibliography

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pp. 447-473

Index

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pp. 475-483