Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 2-5

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 6-11

read more

Prologue

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-8

Jane Grey Swisshelm may have been married to a farmer, but she was no ordinary farm wife. Nor did she, like most farm wives, pass through life quietly and in relative obscurity. During the mid–nineteenth century, her name appeared in newspapers across the United States. ...

read more

CHAPTER ONE: That Olde-Time Religion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 9-32

I was born on the 6th of December, 1815, in Pittsburg , on the bank of the Monongahela, near its confluence with the Allegheny. My father was Thomas Cannon, and my mother Mary Scott. They were both Scotch-Irish and descended from the Scotch Reformers. On my mother’s side were several men and women who signed the ‘‘Solemn League ...

read more

CHAPTER TWO: A Marriage Fraught with Conflict

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 33-59

Whenever two are really weary of each other, they are no longer married; and nobody can marry them. . . . It is a base prostitution of the name and object of marriage to bind two to live together contrary to the will of either. Nor can we see how society can possibly be benefitted by an arrangement which compels the semblance of marriage ...

read more

CHAPTER THREE: The Troublesome Matter of Property

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 61-77

A case was tried in the District Court, commencing on Monday, and concluded yesterday, to decide the liability of Mr. James Swisshelm for the cost of a watch purchased by his wife, Mrs. Jane G. Swisshelm, now editing a newspaper in Minnesota, but well known as the editress of the Saturday Visitor, in this city. The purchase appears to have ...

read more

CHAPTER FOUR: Woman's Work in a Man's World

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 79-102

I went to the Journal office, found Mr. Riddle in his sanctum, and told him the Albatross was dead; the Liberty Party [was] without an organ, and that I was going to start the PITTSBURG SATURDAY VISITER; the first copy must be issued Saturday week, so that abolitionists would not have time to be discouraged, and that I wanted him to print my paper. ...

read more

CHAPTER FIVE: A Different Sort of Politics

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 103-131

There, in the ladies’ gallery, is a woman who will not flinch under my pencil—or anybody’s. Mrs. Jane G. Swisshelm, of Minnesota, one of the sharpest politicians among American women I think, and, for all that, a good housekeeper I know, for I have eaten her biscuits. She has a very large head, high over firmness and self-esteem, wide at combativeness, massive in the intellectual-moral regions, ...

read more

CHAPTER SIX: A World in Need of Improvement

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 133-159

‘‘I remember Mrs. Jane Swisshelm well,’’ said Mrs. P. Lorton, of 231 Market Street [in Louisville, Kentucky], to a reporter yesterday. ‘‘I was a young girl when she first came here. It was somewhere about 1840. They rented a house next door to ours on Second street, and Mr. Swisshelm went into some kind of business. As I remember her then, she was a delicate woman, with bright, piercing eyes. She was very nervous, and had a quick, sharp way of ...

read more

CHAPTER SEVEN: Respectable but Not Genteel

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 161-189

It is a wintery Sabbath morning in the late 1870s; the Reverend Joseph Hunter, holding forth from his Covenanter pulpit to an intent, albeit half-frozen congregation. Suddenly, a small, grey wisp of a woman shiveringly arises from her pew, well up front, marches determinedly down the aisle and out of the church, hurries across the ...

read more

Afterword

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 191-197

Jane Grey Swisshelm was one the most widely read and versatile female journalists in mid–nineteenth century America. She was a provocateur, a propagandist, and a polemicist. Her style was distinctive enough to cause comment. One editor described it as ‘‘poetical, piquant, and pithy.’’ Another noted the ‘‘boldness’’ of her ‘‘unsparing hand.’’∞ She was not the only woman at the time to make a place for herself in the world of ...

read more

Note on Primary Sources

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 199-207

For a historian, the early stages of research are a particularly exciting time, filled with a frenetic kind of activity—reading what has already been written on your topic, visiting archives, and writing letters of inquiry to anyone who might be able to help you locate the sources you need. It is also a period filled with a heightened sense of anticipation and with the feeling that there are no limits to what you can find out about your ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 209-245

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 247-259

I wish to express my thanks to many colleagues and friends, including Anne Butler, Wendy Gamber, Michael Green, Barbara Harris, Nancy Hewitt, Joy Kasson, Roger Lotchin, Laurie Maffly-Kipp, Don Mathews, Theda Perdue, Anne Firor Scott, Sarah Shields, Linda Wagner-Martin, Harry Watson, Margaret Wiener, and an anonymous reader for the University of North Carolina Press. Some read and critiqued all or parts of ...

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 249-255