Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 2-7

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xi

Acknowledging all those good people who helped me along this journey requires more space than is available here. However, a few do stand out. First of all, my deepest gratitude and continued respect go to my mentor and major professor, Dr. James C. Cobb. His simple suggestion to a rather bewildered graduate...

Abbreviations

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pp. xiii-17

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1. Introduction: World War II Veterans and the Politics of Postwar Change in Georgia

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pp. 3-12

When Georgia's servicemen left for the combat theaters of World War II, few anticipated how profound an impact this experience would have on their lives. By the war’s end, however, many of Georgia’s veterans felt sure they knew exactly what their military service had meant. The extreme personal sacrifice made by...

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2. The Ballot Must Be Our Weapon: Black Veterans and the Politics of Racial Change

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pp. 13-36

on March 31, 1946, C.W. Greenlea, director of a black United Service Organizations (USO) center in Atlanta, Georgia, announced the imminent deployment of almost one thousand black veterans of the Second World War to the doorsteps of the city’s black citizenry. Their mission was to encourage black registration...

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3. The Question of Majority Rule: White Veterans and the Politics of Progressive Reform [Includes Image Plates]

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pp. 37-74

Early in 1947, a white ex-Marine chaplain from south Georgia named Joseph Rabun made a ringing declaration for democracy in the halls of the Georgia state capitol. A Baptist minister from McRae in Telfair County, Rabun had served in some of the worst battles of the Pacific war. Now he found himself at a public...

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4. Is This What We Fought the War For? Union Veterans and the Politics of Labor

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pp. 75-111

In 1946 William Shiflett returned from a two-year stint in the army during World War II to the textile mill in Rome, Georgia, where he had previously worked for five years. Anchor Rome Mill, however, was not the same place it had been, nor was Shiflett the same man. During the war, workers in the plant had...

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5. We Are Not Radicals, Neither Are We Reactionaries: Good Government Veterans and the Politics of Modernization

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pp. 113-137

Lieutenant Colonel John J. Flynt wasted little time when he returned to his home in Griffin, Georgia, in 1945 after many months overseas. Having earned a Bronze Star in the European theater, he resumed his former position as assistant U.S. district attorney for north Georgia. Within a few short months, Flynt won...

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6. Hitler Is Not Dead but Has Found Refuge in Georgia: The General Assembly of 1947 and the Limits of Progress

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pp. 139-168

As good government veterans elected throughout the state in 1946 prepared to embark on new postwar political careers, Eugene Talmadge passed into the twilight of his own. Haggard and wan even before the primary election that summer, the intensity of the campaign ruined Talmadge’s already fragile health....

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Conclusion

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pp. 169-172

The turbulent and even curious political conflicts of the postwar 1940s wracked Georgia’s postwar stability, leaving a political landscape undeniably marked by the impact ofWorld War II. Challenges to a smooth reconversion to peace came from many quarters: from black citizens fed up with their secondclass...

Notes

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pp. 173-233

Bibliography

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pp. 235-250

Index

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pp. 251-256