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Nation Building in South Korea
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In this ambitious and innovative study Gregg Brazinsky examines American nation building in South Korea during the Cold War. Marshaling a vast array of new American and Korean sources, he explains why South Korea was one of the few postcolonial nations that achieved rapid economic development and democratization by the end of the twentieth century. Brazinsky contends that a distinctive combination of American initiatives and Korean agency enabled South Korea's stunning transformation. On one hand, Americans supported the emergence of a developmental autocracy that spurred economic growth in a highly authoritarian manner. On the other hand, Americans sought to encourage democratization from the bottom up by fashioning new institutions and promoting a dialogue about modernization and development. Expanding the framework of traditional diplomatic history, Brazinsky examines not only state-to-state relations, but also the social and cultural interactions between Americans and South Koreans. He shows how Koreans adapted, resisted, and transformed American influence and promoted socioeconomic change that suited their own aspirations. Ultimately, Brazinsky argues, Koreans' capacity to tailor American institutions and ideas to their own purposes was the most important factor in the making of a democratic South Korea. In this first English-language analysis of U.S.-Korean relations after the Korean War using primary sources in both languages, Brazinsky examines the U.S.role in reconstructing South Korea: building a national army, launching economic development programs in the 1960s, and fostering, through exchange programs and building schools, new modes of thinking among intellectuals and students. The American commitment to South Korea extended far behond defending the country against Communist invasion, he argues. It served as a vital proving ground for the superiority of free enterprise and political democracy to contrast with the Communist North. Brazinksky shows that American ambitions were met with a great deal of ambivalence by South Koreans, who, after 35 years of Japanese colonialism, were anxious about new forms of domination by foreign powers. Brazinsky demonstrates how South Koreans adapted, resisted, and transformed American influence and fostered socio-economic change that suited their own aspirations. In leading the country from a poor autocratic society in the 1940s to a prosperous democracy by the 1990s, South Koreans went through a phase of developmental autocracy in the 1960s that paved the way for a sustainable democracy. Brazinsky explains why South Korea was one of the few postcolonial nations that achieved rapid economic development and democratization by the end of the twentieth century. He contends that a distinctive combination of American initiatives and Korean agency enabled South Korea's stunning transformation. Expanding the framework of traditional diplomatic history, Brazinsky examines not only state-to-state relations, but also the social and cultural interactions between Americans and South Koreans. He shows how Koreans adapted, resisted, and transformed American influence and promoted socioeconomic change that suited their own aspirations. In this ambitious and innovative study Gregg Brazinsky examines American nation building in South Korea during the Cold War. Marshaling a vast array of new American and Korean sources, he explains why South Korea was one of the few postcolonial nations that achieved rapid economic development and democratization by the end of the twentieth century. Brazinsky contends that a distinctive combination of American initiatives and Korean agency enabled South Korea's stunning transformation. On one hand, Americans supported the emergence of a developmental autocracy that spurred economic growth in a highly authoritarian manner. On the other hand, Americans sought to encourage democratization from the bottom up by fashioning new institutions and promoting a dialogue about modernization and development. Expanding the framework of traditional diplomatic history, Brazinsky examines not only state-to-state relations, but also the social and cultural interactions between Americans and South Koreans. He shows how Koreans adapted, resisted, and transformed American influence and promoted socioeconomic change that suited their own aspirations. Ultimately, Brazinsky argues, Koreans' capacity to tailor American institutions and ideas to their own purposes was the most important factor in the making of a democratic South Korea.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. 1-1
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. 2-7
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. 8-11
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xi-xiv
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-12
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  1. 1. Security over Democracy
  2. pp. 13-40
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  1. 2. Institution Building: Civil Society
  2. pp. 41-70
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  1. 3. Institution Building: The Military
  2. pp. 71-100
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  1. 4. Toward Developmental Autocracy
  2. pp. 101-126
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  1. 5. Development over Democracy
  2. pp. 127-162
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  1. 6. Engaging South Korean Intellectuals
  2. pp. 163-188
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  1. 7 Molding South Korean Youth
  2. pp. 189-222
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  1. 8 Toward Democracy
  2. pp. 223-250
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  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 251-260
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 261-290
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 291-302
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 303-312
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