Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. 2-7

Contents

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pp. vii-ix

Maps

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pp. x-xvi

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Preface

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pp. xvii-xx

I “discovered” it one clear dry afternoon in spring 1998. I was sitting in the small, specialized library of Texas A&M University’s Nautical Archaeology Program, where I teach. I had been thumbing through various titles that I had noticed but had previously not found time to peruse. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xxi-xxii

I have had much welcome assistance during the research and writing of this book. My study of the physical remains of the Gurob ship-cart model, which took place during the summer of 2005, would not have been possible without the gracious and the generous assistance of the staff of the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, ...

Note Regarding Online Resources

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pp. xxiii-xxiv

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Chapter 1. The Gurob Ship-Cart Model

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pp. 1-32

In 1920 William Mathews Flinders Petrie assigned two of his assistants, Guy Brunton and Reginald Engleback, to excavate Gurob, a site that he had first examined three decades earlier (Fig. 1.1).1 Petrie’s renewed interest in the ancient settlement resulted from his concern for the site’s destruction and the loss of antiquities ...

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Chapter 2. The Iconographic Evidence

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pp. 33-84

Despite its Egyptian provenience, as we shall see, the ultimate prototype of the Gurob ship model is clearly a Helladic-style galley of the Late Bronze/Early Iron Ages.1 All later Greek galleys of the Protogeometric, Geometric, Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods essentially evolved from this original Mycenaean galley type.2 ...

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Chapter 3. Wheels, Wagons, and the Transport of Ships Overland

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pp. 85-162

The Gurob ship model was found together with four wheels (Figs. 1.21–22).1 Wheels on a ship sound like the ultimate oxymoron. The model’s wheels imply that the model—and hence the model’s prototype vessel—was intended for travel on land. ...

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Chapter 4. Foreigners at Gurob

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pp. 163-200

The plaque, or pavois, found with the Gurob ship model indicates that it had cultic significance.1 Thus, while we know virtually nothing about the model’s owner, we may assume beyond a reasonable doubt that the model reflects aspects of that person’s religious beliefs. ...

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Chapter 5. Conclusions

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pp. 201-206

Sometime, probably during the late thirteenth or early twelfth century, a competent artisan in Egypt constructed a simple model of a ship. Wooden ship models are virtually unknown in Egypt during the New Kingdom apart from those found in royal XVIIIth-Dynasty tombs, and this model is remarkable for several other reasons as well. ...

Appendix 1: Lines Drawing of the Gurob Ship Model

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pp. 207-208

Appendix 2: The Gurob Ship-Cart Model in Virtual Reality

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pp. 209-218

Appendix 3: Ship Colors in the Homeric Poems

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pp. 219-224

Appendix 4: Sherden and Tjuk-People in the Wilbour Papyrus

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pp. 225-238

Appendix 5: Radiocarbon Age Analysis of the Gurob Ship-Cart Model

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pp. 239-242

Appendix 6: Analysis of Pigments from the Gurob Ship-Cart Model

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pp. 243-248

Appendix 7: Wood Identification

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pp. 249-250

Glossary of Nautical Terms

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pp. 251-254

Notes

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pp. 255-284

Bibliography

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pp. 285-312

Index

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pp. 313-322

Back Cover

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pp. 354-354