In this Book

The Ohio State University Press
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summary
In postbellum America, publishers vigorously reprinted books that were foreign in origin, and Americans thus read internationally even at a moment of national consolidation. A subset of Americans’ international reading—nearly 100 original texts, approximately 180 American translations, more than 1,000 editions and reprint editions, and hundreds of thousands of books strong—comprised popular fiction written by German women and translated by American women. German Writing, American Reading: Women and the Import of Fiction, 1866–1917 by Lynne Tatlock examines the genesis and circulation in America of this hybrid product over four decades and beyond. These entertaining novels came to the consumer altered by processes of creative adaptation and acculturation that occurred in the United States as a result of translation, marketing, publication, and widespread reading over forty years. These processes in turn de-centered and disrupted the national while still transferring certain elements of German national culture. Most of all, this mass translation of German fiction by American women trafficked in happy endings that promised American readers that their fondest wishes for adventure, drama, and bliss within domesticity and their hope for the real power of love, virtue, and sentiment could be pleasurably realized in an imagined and quaintly old-fashioned Germany—even if only in the time it took to read a novel.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. 1-1
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. 2-7
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. List of Illustrations
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. xi-xii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xiii-xiv
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  1. Part One: German Writing, American Reading
  2. pp. 1-2
  1. Chapter 1. Introduction: Made in Germany, Read in America
  2. pp. 3-27
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  1. Chapter 2. German Women Writers at Home and Abroad
  2. pp. 28-50
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  1. Part Two: German Texts as American Books
  2. pp. 51-52
  1. Chapter 3. “Family Likenesses”: Marlitt’s Texts as American Books
  2. pp. 53-82
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  1. Chapter 4. The German Art of the Happy Ending: Embellishing and Expanding the Boundaries of Home
  2. pp. 83-120
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  1. Chapter 5. Enduring Domesticity: German Novels of Remarriage
  2. pp. 121-155
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  1. Chapter 6. Feminized History: German Men in American Translation
  2. pp. 156-194
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  1. Part Three: Three Americanizers: Translating, Publishing, Reading
  2. pp. 195-198
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  1. Chapter 7. Family Matters in Postbellum America: Ann Mary Crittenden Coleman (1813–91)
  2. pp. 199-215
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  1. Chapter 8. German Fiction Clothed in “so brilliant a garb”: Annis Lee Wister (1830–1908)
  2. pp. 216-235
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  1. Chapter 9. Germany at Twenty-Five Cents a Copy: Mary Stuart Smith (1834–1917)
  2. pp. 236-262
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  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 263-266
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  1. Appendix A: American Periodicals Cited
  2. pp. 267-268
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  1. Appendix B: late Nineteenth- and Early Twentieth-Century U.S. Library Catalogs and Finding Lists Consulted as an Index of Enduring Circulation
  2. pp. 269-284
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  1. Appendix C: Total German Novels Translated in America (1866–1917) by Woman Author
  2. pp. 270-285
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  1. Appendix D: Total Number of Translations of German Novels in the United States (1866–1917) by Woman Author
  2. pp. 271-286
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  1. Appendix E: Total American Publications (1866–1917) by Woman Author
  2. pp. 272-287
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 273-321
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 322-330
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 331-347
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