In this Book

The Ohio State University Press
summary
Witches, Goddesses and Angry Spirits: The Politics of Spiritual Liberation in African Diaspora Women’s Fiction explores African diaspora religious practices as vehicles for Africana women’s spiritual transformation, using representative fictions by three contemporary writers of the African Americas who compose fresh models of female spirituality: Breath, Eyes, Memory (1994) by Haitian American novelist Edwidge Danticat; Paradise (1998) by African American Nobel laureate Toni Morrison; and I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem (1992) by Guadeloupean author Maryse Condé.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. 1-1
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. 2-5
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Illustrations
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Chapter 1. Introduction: A Theoretical and Thematic Framework
  2. pp. 1-36
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  1. Chapter 2. In the Spirit of Erzulie: Vodou and the Reimagining of Haitian Womanhood in Edwidge Danticat’s Breath, Eyes, Memory
  2. pp. 37-70
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  1. Chapter 3. “Thunder, Perfect Mind”: Candomblé, Gnosticism, and the Utopian Impulse in Toni Morrison’s Paradise
  2. pp. 71-102
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  1. Chapter 4. Conjuring History: The Meaning of Witchcraft in Maryse Condé’s I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem
  2. pp. 103-152
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  1. Chapter 5. Conclusion: The Return of Witches, Goddesses, and Angry Spirits
  2. pp. 153-158
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 159-166
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 167-180
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