Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Frontmatter

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 8-9

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

Figures

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

Tables

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xii

read more

Foreword

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xiv

What a strange, timid and elusive creature the pronghorn was to the Euro-Americans who first broached North America’s western grasslands. It reminded them of a “cabri,” or goat, sort of—a very speedy goat. It was difficult to approach, difficult to kill and, when...

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xv-xvi

The least known, least understood and perhaps most fascinating big game animal in the Western Hemisphere is the pronghorn. Ironically, it is the most “American” of the continent’s terrestrial wildlife. The pronghorn is found only in North America and is the sole living member of an ancient family,...

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xvii-23

The authors are grateful for the help, cooperation and enthusiasm extended us by a great many people during the course of preparing this book. In particular, we recognize Glenna J. Dean and staffs of the Valley Library, Oregon State University, Corvallis, the Bancroft Library, University...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-2

Early in wecukanheyaye of a sweltering day of Wípazuk wašté wi in the year remembered as Pehin Hanksa ktepi, fewer than 500 akiæita oeuktayka, led by vainglorious Hi-es-tze, fell upside down into a huge village of Tsististas and Lakota temporarily encamped along a 3-mile (...

read more

Prehistory

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-32

Successors of the Sublette pronghorn herd still migrate annually between Grand Teton National Park and their winter ranges south of Pinedale, Wyoming, as they have for 8,000 years or more. During particularly severe winters, they continue southward to...

read more

History

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 33-133

An aspect of pronghorn history of minor practical importance is identification of which humans first saw or recorded the species. By the time Old World explorers visited pronghorn range and observed this species unknown to the rest of the world, the animal had been well known...

Appendix A. SELECT EYEWITNESS, HISTORIC ACCOUNTS OF PRONGHORN ABUNDANCE IN THE WEST

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 135-142

Appendix B. SELECT NATIVE AMERICAN NAMES FOR PRONGHORN

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 143-150

References

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 151-169

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 171-175