Cover

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pp. 1-3

Title Page

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pp. 4-4

Copyright Page

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pp. 5-5

Dedication Page

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pp. 6-7

Table of Contents

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pp. vii-9

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Introduction

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pp. 1-23

Shortly after Robinson Crusoe makes his providential landing on the island, he takes stock ofhis situation and makes a list of the "good" and "evil" aspects of his circumstances. Most of his laments have to do with his complete isolation (or at least his isolation from anything recognizably British); but he also...

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1. Institutionalizing Xenophobia: Johnson's Project

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pp. 24-64

How does language get institutionalized? Johnson's 1755 A Dictionary of the English Language and his Preface to this project address some of the strategies involved in standardizing language. Embedded in Johnson's Preface are ideas that reflect his understanding of language as a cultural barometer. Johnson's...

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2. De Quincey and the Topography of Romantic Desire

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pp. 65-95

Johnson's restoration of authorial space to its proper place is forged by purging the "impurities" he perceives in language. London, for example, articulates with considerable poignancy the problems Johnson identifies with cultural representation. Even while fashioning a space for authorship, Johnson is highly...

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3. Mothered Identities: Facing the Nation in the Works of Mary Wollstonecraft

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pp. 96-116

At the end of the last chapter I suggested that the boundaries defining romantic authorial subjectivity are contingent on an uneasy domesticity that balances homeopathic xenodochy with the purging effects of xenophobia. How does gender affect this balance? Perhaps it may be more accurate to argue that...

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4. Fair Exotics: Two Case Histories in Frankenstein and Villette

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pp. 117-147

In this chapter I continue to examine the problems gender poses to ideological configurations of romantic identity by examining two novels. Shelley's Frankenstein and Bronte's Villette are narratives that mark the perimeters of feminine domesticity as national affiliation. Both novels demonstrate to varying...

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Afterword

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pp. 148-151

The Oxford English Dictionary identifies the first use of the word "fair" (in England) to refer specifically to lightness of complexion as occurring in 1551 (in T. Wilson's Logike). The first appearance of Africans in London is generally dated around 1555, "when five Africans arrived to learn English and thereby...

Notes

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pp. 153-179

Works Cited

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pp. 181-188

Index

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pp. 189-198

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 199-200

I have long fantasized about the time when I would finally be able to thank the many people who have contributed to the making of this book. Now that I am actually writing these acknowledgments, however, I find the moment more poignant than jubilant and somewhat daunting because I have incurred so...