Cover

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pp. 1-3

Title Page

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pp. 4-4

Copyright Page

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pp. 5-5

Table of Contents

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pp. 6-7

List of Illustrations

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pp. vii-9

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Preface

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pp. ix-xii

Scholars who investigate race-a label that asserts the identification of individuals based upon real or perceived physical differences-realize that they face a formidable task. History records that learned academicians, committed political activists, well-intentioned relief workers, empowered citizens, and disfranchised outcasts have variously contested and ...

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1. Problematizing Race in Archaeology

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pp. 1-38

During a journey through Ireland in 1835, French traveler Gustave de Beaumont, who had recently returned to Europe after an extended sojourn in the United States, experienced a startling revelation. Prior to visiting Ireland, he had believed that the living conditions he had observed among the dispossessed Native Americans and enslaved Africans ...

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2. The Prehistory of Race and Archaeological Interpretation, Part 1: Inventing Race for Archaeology

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pp. 39-74

When considering an archaeological interpretation of race, it is instructive to retreat from the present and delve into archaeology's past. A withdrawal into archaeological history accomplishes two important tasks. First, it provides a perspective on the development of archaeological thought as it pertains to race and racialization, and second, it helps to ...

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3. The Prehistory of Race and Archaeological Interpretation, Part II: Ethnicity over Race

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pp. 75-111

Archaeologists have been interested in documenting the relationship between human variability and the material expressions of daily life ever since they realized that artifacts from the past could be visualized as more than historical documents. As an anthropological-historical approach gained acceptance in archaeology, greater numbers ofthe field's practitioners were compelled ...

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4. Archaeological Interpretation and the Practice of Race

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pp. 112-157

The previous chapters demonstrate that archaeologists have long experience handling the concept of race, even though their understandings of this important social variable have changed over time. Many late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century archaeologists were inspired by the period's neophyte physical anthropologists, and so they tended to envision race as a biological objectivity with concrete, readily identifiable ...

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5. Materiality in the Practice of Race

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pp. 158-195

The construction of past habitus, field, and capital for specific sociohistoric formations constitutes only half of the archaeological project. If social archaeologists cease their research with the modeling the social structure, no matter how complex the model may be, they are acting as historical sociologists and not archaeologists, even though the creation of the model is a necessary ...

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6. A Case Study of Archaeology and the Practice of Race from Early Nineteenth-Century Ireland

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pp. 196-246

The previous chapters have outlined one perspective that may be employed in the archaeological analysis of historic racialization. The chapters are intended to present overviews of the history of the archaeological analysis of race and to provide a coherent framework for conducting an archaeological interpretation of race that is both theoretically ...

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7. Race, Practice, and Archaeology

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pp. 247-254

The archaeological application of practice theory is only at the experimental stage. The novelty of this approach, especially as it pertains to the study of race-a topic that has yet to achieve prominence among archaeologists- mandates that this book must be viewed as an initial foray into a difficult and multifaceted realm of inquiry. Future archaeologists who ...

References Cited

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pp. 255-297

Index

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pp. 299-306