Cover

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pp. 1-5

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Preface

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pp. vii-ix

The concept of security has undergone a significant change since the 1980s. Amid growing criticism of the realist security discourse, the concept has been increasingly enlarged to include agendas beyond the military dimension of interstate relations. Definitions of security and insecurity have been broadened to encompass the greater number of ...

Part I Issues of Non-Traditional Security in North Korea

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pp. 1-13

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Chapter 1 Rethinking National and Human Security in North Korea via Non-Traditional Security Issues

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pp. 3-22

Most discussion of North Korea (the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea) focuses on traditional security issues. The Korean Peo-ple’s Army remains the target of obsessive analysis, for it is one of the most serious sources of threat to the peace and security of the neigh-boring countries. Its Special Forces receive special attention since they are deemed especially capable of wreaking havoc on South Korea’s de-...

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Chapter 2 North Korea’s Energy Security: Challenges and Assistance Approaches

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pp. 23-50

Energy-sector needs and requirements for energy security together constitute a critical dimension of the North Korean nuclear weapons challenge. Energy-sector issues—specifically, the difficulties of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) in obtaining energy supplies and maintaining aging energy-supply infrastructure—have been a driver of its nuclear weapons policies. On the other side of the ...

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Chapter 3 Gender Security in North Korea

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pp. 51-74

Amid growing criticism of the realist security discourse, the concept of security has undergone significant changes over the years. Many studies have argued that the principal unit of security analysis should not be confined to the state but should include society and the individ-ual as well. In particular, the Copenhagen school and human-security scholars define security in terms of freedom from threats to the safety ...

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Chapter 4 Securitizing Transnational Organized Crime and North Korea’s Non-Traditional Security

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pp. 75-99

In September 2005, the U.S. Treasury Department sanctioned a small bank in Macao named Banco Delta Asia (BDA), accusing it of laundering money for the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK). The repercussions were immediate and widespread: the bank itself was frozen out of global credit markets as other banks worried about the reputational effect of working with BDA. North Korea protested long ...

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Chapter 5 Building Food Security in North Korea

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pp. 100-132

For at least the past fifteen years the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) has not produced enough food to feed its population, and continuing production shortfalls since 1995 have not been covered by foreign aid or imports. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) estimated a shortfall of about 20 percent for 2010 and 14 percent for 2011.1 ...

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Chapter 6 The External Dimension of North Korea’s Food Security: Securing Outside Supplies of Food, Fertilizer, and Fuel

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pp. 133-153

Despite the Kim regime’s ideological emphasis on juche, or “self-reliance,” the outside world has always been essential to food security in North Korea. During the decades of relative plenty, the 1950s through the mid-1980s, North Korea imported, at special “friendship prices,” important agricultural inputs such as fertilizer and fuel from patrons such as the Soviet Union. In the famine and postfamine years ...

Part II Global Cooperation for Promoting North Korea’s Non-Traditional Security

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Chapter 7 The Responsibility to Protect and Its Limits in North Korea

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pp. 157-182

...“Rwanda’s genocide, massacres in Srebrenica, Cambodia’s killing fields, ethnic cleansing in Kosovo, the Holocaust: these experiences—both their human toll and the political and institutional failures they represent—have seared humanity.”1 The responsibility to protect (RtoP) represents the international community’s most recent attempt to prevent the reoccurrence of these man-made crises. It establishes a ...

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Chapter 8 International Legal Perspectives on North Korean Refugee Issues

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pp. 183-208

Under conditions of extreme poverty and devastating famine, many North Koreans have defected. If they make it to South Korea, they are almost always granted asylum and citizenship under the South Korean constitution. However, direct defection by means of crossing through the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ), dotted with land mines, razor wire, and a heavy American and South Korean troop presence, is often ...

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Chapter 9 The Role of Nongovernmental Organizations in Protecting Pyongyang’s Non-Traditional Security

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pp. 209-225

In a globalized and interconnected world, the role of civil society has expanded to the extent that nongovernmental actors have established agency in one form or another in an effort to address global problems, especially in the area of human security. Non-traditional security challenges are particularly amenable to problem-solving efforts on the part of nonstate actors, individuals, and associations precisely because the ...

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Chapter 10 Toward the Enhancement of Non-Traditional Security in North Korea

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pp. 226-248

Prussian General Carl von Clausewitz, the great military strategist, famously referred to war as “a mere continuation of policy by other means.” However, his preceding concept that “war is an act of violence intended to compel our opponent to fulfill our will” is equally important to this study.1 When combined they present vital implications for our analysis of traditional and non-traditional security: namely, that in ...

Contributors

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pp. 249-255

Index

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pp. 257-265