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Beyond Pontiac's Shadow
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On June 2, 1763, the Ojibwe captured Michigan’s Fort Michilimackinac from the British. Ojibwe warriors from villages on Mackinac Island and along the Cheboygan River had surprised the unsuspecting garrison while playing a game of baggatiway. On the heels of the capture, Odawa from nearby L’Arbre Croche arrived to rescue British prisoners, setting into motion a complicated series of negotiations among Ojibwe, Odawa, and Menominee and other Indians from Wisconsin. Because nearly all Native people in the Michilimackinac borderland had allied themselves with the British before the attack, they refused to join the Michilimackinac Ojibwe in their effort to oust the British from the upper country; the turmoil effectively halted the fur trade. Beyond Pontiac’s Shadow examines the circumstances leading up to the attack and the course of events in the aftermath that resulted in the regarrisoning of the fort and the restoration of the fur trade. At the heart of this discussion is an analysis of French-Canadian and Indian communities at the Straits of Mackinac and throughout the pays d’en haut. An accessible guide to this important period in Michigan, American, and Canadian history, Beyond Pontiac’s Shadow sheds invaluable light on a political and cultural crisis.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. 1-1
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  1. Title Page, Copyright Page
  2. pp. 2-7
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Foreword
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xi-xvi
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. xvii-xxviii
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  1. Chapter One. Michilimackinac, 1760: At the Heart of North America
  2. pp. 3-30
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  1. Chapter Two. Michilimackinac, 1761: A French-Canadian, Odawa, and Ojibwe Community
  2. pp. 31-54
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  1. Chapter Three. Detroit, 1760–1761: The British Enter the Pays d’en Haut
  2. pp. 55-74
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  1. Chapter Four. Michilimackinac, 1761: British Troops Take Possession of the Fort and the Posts at La Baye and St. Joseph
  2. pp. 75-94
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  1. Chapter Five. Prelude to War, 1762–1763: Amherst’s Policies, Native Unrest, and the Diplomacy of Thomas Hutchins and James Gorrell
  2. pp. 95-124
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  1. Chapter Six. Michilimackinac on the Brink, Spring 1763
  2. pp. 125-140
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  1. Chapter Seven. Michilimackinac, Summer 1763: Attack, Exile, Diplomacy, Loss, Repatriation
  2. pp. 141-168
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  1. Chapter Eight. Crown Officials Respond to Calamity, Late 1763 and Early 1764
  2. pp. 169-188
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  1. Chapter Nine. Prelude to British Reoccupation of Fort Michilimackinac, 1764
  2. pp. 189-202
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  1. Chapter Ten. The British Return to Michilimackinac, 1764–1765
  2. pp. 203-222
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  1. Epilogue
  2. pp. 223-224
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  1. Appendix One. Michilimackinac Families
  2. pp. 225-236
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  1. Appendix Two. Dietrich Brehm’s Reports for 1760 and 1761
  2. pp. 237-252
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  1. Appendix Three. Deeds, December 21, 1760
  2. pp. 253-260
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 261-298
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 299-312
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 313-331
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