Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-9

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xii

This work would not have been possible without the support and generosity of Eudora Welty’s nieces, Mary Alice Welty White and the late Elizabeth Welty Thompson. I am very grateful to them for trusting me with this project, and I thank Mary Alice for meeting with me...

read more

Introduction: Gardener, Friend, and Artist

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xxx

Eudora Welty (1909–2001) is an acknowledged master of the short story form. For over fifty years, such Welty stories as “Why I Live at the P.O.,” “A Worn Path,” “Petrified Man,” and “Livvie” have appeared in anthologies and textbooks treating short fiction, literature by...

read more

Editorial Note

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xxxi-xxxii

The letters in this book come from the Eudora Welty Collection in the Mississippi Department of Archives and History in Jackson, Mississippi. In addition to letters Welty wrote, this collection holds hundreds of letters Diarmuid Russell and John Robinson sent to Welty, and I have...

read more

Chapter One: May 1940–December 1941

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-46

When Welty wrote her first letter to Diarmuid Russell in May of 1940, at the age of thirty-one, she was not famous, but her fiction had been successful enough to attract Russell’s attention as he sought clients for his new literary agency. A native of Jackson, Welty had graduated from the University of Wisconsin...

read more

Chapter Two: January 1942–August 1943

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 47-95

By January 1942 Welty and Russell were planning for her next book, a group of stories that were all connected to the Natchez Trace, an ancient trail running from Natchez, Mississippi, to Nashville, Tennessee. The setting of the Trace was inspiring Welty to...

read more

Chapter Three: September 1943–October 1944

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 97-142

During the summer of 1943, Welty had closed a letter to Robinson with the phrase “I still water the garden” (8.21.43); unsure how he had fared during the invasion of Sicily, she tried to maintain a hopeful outlook. Throughout the following year, Welty...

read more

Chapter Four: October 1944–December 1945

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 145-178

Back in her Jackson garden in October 1944, Welty was still anxious about Robinson, who was volunteering to accompany pilots from his squadron on night missions in northern Italy. The end of the war now seemed much farther off than it had in A...

read more

Chapter Five: January 1946–October 1949

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 181-226

By early 1946, many of Welty’s wishes during the war years had come true: the war was over and friends and family were safe; John Robinson was out of the army and back in Jackson; Delta Wedding, which turned out to be a novel after all, was serialized...

Appendix: Correspondence from Eudora Welty, Diarmuid Russell, and John Robinson

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 227-237

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 238-255

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 256-259

Index [Includes Image Plates]

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 260-275