In this Book

Cracks in the Invisible
summary

Stephen Kampa’s poems are witty and restless in their pursuit of an intelligent modern faith. They range from a four-line satire of office inspirational posters to a lengthy meditation on the silence of God. The poems also revel in the prosodic possibilities of English’s high and low registers: a twenty–one line homage to Lord Byron that turns on three rhymes (one of which is “eisegesis”); a sestina whose end words include “sentimental,” “Marseilles,” and “Martian;” sapphics on the death of Ray Charles; and intricately modulated stanzas on the 1931 Spanish–language movie version of Dracula.

 
Despite the metaphysical seriousness, there is always an undercurrent of stylistic levity — a panoply of puns, comic rhymes, and loving misquotations of canonical literature — that suggests comedy and tragedy are inextricably bound in human experience.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title page
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  1. Copyright
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Aperture
  2. pp. 1-4
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  1. I. Sightings
  2. pp. 5-18
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  1. II. Sidewalk Chalk
  2. pp. 19-32
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  1. III. Elegies and Valedictions
  2. pp. 33-48
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  1. IV. Voices in My Head
  2. pp. 49-64
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  1. V. Absence Makes the Heart
  2. pp. 65-82
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  1. VI. A Little Wind and Smoke
  2. pp. 83-106
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 107-108
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