COVER Front

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Series Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. 2-7

Table of Contents

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pp. vii-9

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

My work on hate speech was inspired by four families, all of which I call mine. My first family was the one I had grown up in: a conservative, Christian, middle-class, white family in Hungary. Some members of this family held many strong convictions and had only few curious questions about the racial, ethic, and political...

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Introduction: Cultural thinking About Social Issues

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pp. 1-11

This book investigates the relationships among these propositions, and asks what we can learn from those relationships. More generally speaking, this book is about the cultural foundations of public communication, and about how cultural thinking can be used to inform political action through public expression....

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Chapter 1: History as Context

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pp. 12-27

Issues do not just “lie there,” waiting to be discussed—they are the products of communication.1 The communicative “making” of issues, as a type of social action, always takes place in, and draws on, a variety of contexts. The first element of cultural thinking about a social issue like hate speech is the careful examination...

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Chapter 2: Diversity of Meaning

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pp. 28-46

“Hate speech” is not only a social issue; it is also a term for a type of communicative action. The meanings of the term, as we will see, affect the meaning of the issue. Participants in public debates about hate speech or any other social issue that they refer to with a hotly contested term (such as “terrorism” or “poverty”)...

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Chapter 3: Interpretations: Tone Versus Content

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pp. 47-63

For anyone interested in the language of argument and debate, the mass media are a good place to look for material. As Deborah Tannen pointed out in The Argument Culture,1 the media often act on the assumption, in the name of journalistic objectivity, that every issue has two sides. Presenting confrontation between two...

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Chapter 4: Interpretations: How to Sanction “Hate Ppeech”

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pp. 64-80

Most of us are not used to thinking about the law as something “cultural.” In fact, we like to think of the law as an entirely culture-free system of social controls that shapes the lives of all citizens without regard to their culture, race, or ethnicity. But, as with everything humans do, law and lawmaking can also be made the...

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Chapter 5: Rhetorical Resistance

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pp. 81-97

In Hungary, hate speech is generally discussed as a type of derogatory public expression targeting ethnic minorities, such as Romanies (Gypsies) or Jews. Typically, when public figures propose that hate speech ought to be eradicated, they have racist hate speech in mind. The antiracist efforts of such public figures...

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Chapter 6: From Cultural Knowledge to Political Action

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pp. 98-113

Having mapped the cultural terrain on which “hate speech” became such a hotly contested and debated issue in Hungary, it is time to ask: What can practitioners (politicians, policy analysts, activists, deliberation facilitators, concerned citizens, etc.) do with cultural knowledge? In what sense does cultural thinking...

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Appendix: Theory and Methods

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pp. 114-124

According to a traditional, received vision of ethnography, the ethnographic process looks something like this: an ethnographer arrives in an alien cultural community living in an easily identifiable geographic locale or site, spends at least a year in that community interacting with the “natives” and typing up reams...

Notes

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pp. 125-132

References

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pp. 133-142

Index

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pp. 143-148

COVER Back

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pp. 160-160