Cover

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pp. 1-5

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-x

Scholarship is a collective endeavor, even in the production of so-called monographs. I have many people to thank for helping me produce this one. This project began at the University of California at San Diego, where Joseph Esherick and Paul Pickowicz provided invaluable guidance and frank criticism from its inception to its current end. ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-22

In the February 1938 issue of National Geographic, Julius Eigner introduced the magazine’s substantial reading public to the city of Nanjing. By that time many readers may already have heard of the widely publicized atrocities committed by the Japanese in late 1937 and early 1938. ...

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Chapter 1. The Capital Established: Sun Yat-sen, Nationalist China, and Nanjing

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pp. 23-54

New capitals are always the product of politically motivated decisions that grow out of power struggles and cultural contestations in new polities (Vale 1992). New capital locations symbolize changes of power, goals, and attitudes, and when nation-states incorporate multiple regional interests and diverse cultural units, their selection rarely represents consensus. ...

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Chapter 2. Visions of Grandeur in the Capital Plan

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pp. 55-88

When one looks closely at any system of governance over time, it tends to look more like an ever-changing work in progress than a truly eternal institution. But, of course, all systems claim to be based on a solid foundation of eternal values and constant forms. ...

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Chapter 3. Administrative Aesthetics and Architectural Revolution in the Capital

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pp. 89-124

During the Nanjing Decade, designers attempted to create an “architectural revolution” in the capital city. The main patron of this revolution was the Nationalist Government led by the Guomindang, which hired Chinese architects to plan and build an area devoted to the national administration. ...

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Chapter 4. The Necropolis of Nanjing: The GMD’s Ceremonial Center and Cosmological Microcosm

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pp. 125-166

A distinct culture consists of a web of entangled symbol systems. In his essays on culture, Clifford Geertz described the role of symbols and rituals in religious, ideological, and aesthetic systems of meaning as interacting in a cultural matrix of contending social groups.1 ...

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Chapter 5. Lessons in Allure: Celebrations of State in the Capital

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pp. 167-203

The Sun Yat-sen Mausoleum was the most important structure in the Guomindang’s attempt to create a new state ritual that would ensure its place in the “center of things,” which would help to legitimate its self-proclaimed role as the leader of a revolutionary, modern China. ...

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Chapter 6. Views from the Street: Development, Defiance, and Discipline in Nanjing

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pp. 204-244

On maps of Nanjing from the 1930s, everything looks to be clear, orderly, and rational. A thick line representing Sun Yat-sen Road runs from one side of the city to the other, with neat lines crossing at regular intervals, denoting trunk lines and arterial secondary roads that effectually establish boundaries between commercial centers and newly developing neighborhoods. ...

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Conclusion

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pp. 245-266

Nationalist Party efforts to construct a model capital that would produce modern citizens succeeded in changing the expectations of the people in the city and, arguably, across the country. Indeed, citizens had appeared. They were not the cooperative students of political tutelage that the GMD had hoped to cultivate, ...

Notes

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pp. 267-284

Bibliography

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pp. 285-304

Index

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pp. 305-316