Cover

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pp. 1-2

Half-title

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pp. 3-4

Title

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pp. 5-5

Copyright

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pp. vii-6

Dedication

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pp. 7-8

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface

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pp. ix-14

This book brings together studies of the three main fields of Jewish folklore in Israel: rural settlement, immigration and absorption, and ethnic groups. Part 1 deals with stories about the initial settlement of kibbutzim. The period of Jewish national settlement in Eretz Israel in the modern age, an enterprise that in the words of the Balfour Declaration aimed at “the establishment in...

Part I. The Settlement in the Land of Israel: Kibbutz Local Legends

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pp. 1-6

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1. “Forest of Thorns into a Flourishing Garden”: Local Legends and Cultural Interpretation

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pp. 7-28

This chapter examines stories about the founding of Kibbutz Gennosar. As Tamar Katriel and Aliza Shenhar note: “Acts of settlement and the rhetoric of place attending them have been at the heart of Israel’s nation-building ethos. The dense, at times uneasy, narrative symbolism in which past and present Israeli discourses of settlement have been cast ...

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2. Processes of Change in the Kibbutz as Reflected in Local Legends

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pp. 29-50

A variety of legends about people and events are associated with Kibbutz Ein Harod. With regard to their genre, it is convenient to call these stories “historical legends.” Although some of the stories being told in that community today were circulated there in the past, others were never told in the past, even though they deal with personalities and events from that time. Moreover, the people and events featured in these stories were formerly viewed as better...

Part II. Legends of Immigration and Absorption

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pp. 51-56

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3. “The Camouflaged Plums”: Sweet versus Bitter in Legends of Absorption of Polish Jews

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pp. 57-70

The most important change in immigrant folklore studies, as I see it, is the focus on folklore created by immigrants based on their experience as immigrants. Of course the immigrants still use the well-known and familiar cultural patterns they brought from the “old country.” But their new creations are an immediate outcome of their migration and every-...

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4. The Legend of Yemenite Jews as an Expression of Immigration and Absorption

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pp. 71-88

This chapter examines the folk legends of Yemenite Jews in Israel with an emphasis on the expression of the encounter with Israeli reality and culture after their immigration.1 Needless to say, the change of language, and of country, has led to significant changes in the folk legends that the narrators brought from their country of origin, Yemen. For many of the ...

Part III. Ethnic Folklore in Israel

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pp. 89-110

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5. Old Jewish Moroccan Women Relate in an Israeli Context

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pp. 90-96

The two stories and two storytelling events in this chapter were recorded in the town of Shelomi in the 1980s. Shelomi lies in the western Galilee, not far from the Lebanese border, about twelve kilometers from Nahariya and forty-two kilometers from Haifa. Founded in the 1950s to absorb immigrants from the mass waves that followed the establishment of Israel, Shelomi is named for...

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6. Ethnic Nonverbal Components in the Jewish Moroccan Saints’ Legend

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pp. 97-152

Every culture is built of different systems of signs. Language and how it is used is a key element of every ethnic culture. Body language, including mimetic devices, gestures, and intonation, also characterizes and distinguishes an ethnic culture. In Israel, too, certain ethnic groups have become known for their distinctive body language, which has even become central to the popular...

Notes

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pp. 167-176

Bibliography

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pp. 177-184

Index of Names and Places

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pp. 185-189