Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright Page

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 2-7

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

The resources, friendships, advice, and training of colleagues, friends, family, and institutions on two continents contributed to the formation of this book. With respect to those in the United States, I thank my advisors at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, Florencia Mallon, Steve Stern, and Francisco Scarano. ...

read more

Introduction: Indian Problems, Indian Solutions

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-15

On March 29, 1899, in the midst of a civil war pitting the Liberals against the Conservatives, the Liberal Party supporter and Aymara indigenous community leader of Peñas, Juan Lero, received a letter from a neighboring Indian community leader. ...

read more

1. The Aymara in the Civil War of 1899: Enemy or Ally of the Liberal Party?

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 16-55

From December 1898 through April 1899, Creole and Aymara indigenous forces allied themselves with the Liberal Party in an effort to seize leadership of the country from President Severo Alonso and the ruling Conservatives. On April 10, 1899, the Liberal Party defeated the army and took control of the nation. ...

read more

2. From Aymara Liberals to Exemplary Incas: Nation Building in Early Twentieth-Century Bolivia

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 56-85

In 1900 much of the Bolivian public suffered from a quotidian fear of the savage, vengeful Aymara cannibal, an image promoted throughout the war by newspapers associated with the Conservative and, to a certain extent, Liberal Parties. Indians were accused of having looted towns and murdered citizens following the Civil War of 1899, ...

read more

3. Incantations of Nation and the Theatrical Performance of the Inca Past

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 86-120

La Paz intellectuals were not the only group needing to redefine Aymara identity following the civil war. In the post-1899 context, Aymara communities increasingly attempted to distinguish and disassociate themselves from the infamous and stereotypical image of their people as savage. ...

read more

4. New Stages in Defining Indian Identity: The Ethnic Politics of Caracollo’s Contemporary Inca Play

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 121-145

Elite residents of Caracollo acted Inca in the early twentieth century to seek resonance within the liberal nation-building project and to avoid the stigma of being Aymara; in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, however, folkloric performers have created new images of highland Indian identity. ...

read more

Conclusion: Inca Play, Aymara Encore

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 146-156

In Bolivia, the Civil War of 1899 still stands at the crossroads of fierce contemporary political and regional conflicts. The war has occupied a central space in Sucre’s historical narrative for over a century; that city’s historical claim as the first, and previously only, capital of Bolivia has been rekindled in the light of Evo Morales’s presidency ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 157-180

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 181-188

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 189-194

Back Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 210-210