Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-6

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

Over the dozen or so years of my work on this project, I have benefited immensely from the counsel, editing, proofreading, and sage advice of so many friends and colleagues that either recollecting or recompensing them fully seems nearly impossible. My desire to offer some semblance of thanks, however, prompts me to at least try here. ...

read more

Introduction: Soldier’s Heart

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-24

Marilyn Wesley suggests that the best American war literature serves as an intermediary between the event that inspires the violent depictions and cultural assumptions about that event. Male Armor intends to show another way that representations of American wars function as an intermediary, ...

read more

Chapter 1. “The Great General Was a Has-Been”: The World War II Hero in 1950s Conformist Culture

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 25-61

In his 1952 novella, The Old Man and the Sea, Ernest Hemingway introduced his American reading audience to the term salao, which means the “worst form of unlucky” (9). Hemingway attributes the term to his protagonist, Santiago, and describes him as “thin and gaunt with deep wrinkles in the back of his neck” (9). ...

read more

Chapter 2. The Bridge to Vietnam: The War Story and AWOL Masculinity

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 62-70

Because of its relatively late appearance (1961), nonlinear narrative style, and dubious representation of historical fact and chronology, critics have been hard-pressed to refer to Joseph Heller’s Catch-22 as a World War II novel, and the book’s repeated references to exigencies of Cold War America do not help clarify matters. ...

read more

Chapter 3. Envelope, Please: The Metonymic Male

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 71-96

At one point in Dispatches, Michael Herr’s memoir of the years he spent in Vietnam as a correspondent for Esquire magazine, Herr calls Catch-22 “a Nam standard because it said that in a war everybody thinks that everybody else is crazy” (210). While Catch-22 repeatedly features the idea that war makes everyone crazy, ...

read more

Chapter 4. Winning This Time: The War That Wasn’t

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 97-124

In The Great War and Modern Memory Paul Fussell connects the process of “training in military maneuver and technique” with the structure of the “paradigm” war memoir. Fussell claims that both follow a three-step development: “first, preparation; then execution; and finally, critique” (130). ...

read more

Conclusion: Time Warp

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 125-132

The concordance function at Amazon.com reveals that the three most frequently recurring words in Anthony Swofford’s Jarhead (2003) are “marines,” “know,” and “war.” The idea these words instantiate must emerge—if not directly, at least unwittingly or subconsciously—for readers of Swofford’s text. ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 133-142

Works Cited

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 143-152

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 153-160

Further Reading

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 175-176