Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. -

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. -

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. -

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xiv

This is not the book I was supposed to write. Nor is it the book I set out to write. As it turned out, it is the book I wanted to write.The plan was for me to produce a short, popular, illustrated history of Alabama. That was what I was asked to do. Thinking it an interesting idea, I agreed. But in the months that followed the

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xv- xvii

This book has been pre-read by more people than any I have writ-When I was writing it as the text for a popular, illustrated history,Press, sent chapters out to various people (one known to me and the other not), and their comments were particularly helpful. The reader and in her cheerful, scholarly way offered suggestions and warnings...

read more

1 Back When It Belonged to the Indians

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-19

It is hard to say, exactly, when or where Alabama’s prehistoric founders wandered in, but they did. Maybe first into the Tennessee Valley, that rich divot of red land north of the river where part of Alabama’s plantation system will later take root. Or maybe they...

read more

2 Frontier Alabama

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 20-40

The treaty that gave the United States its independence in 1783 left both the new nation and her Spanish neighbor in Florida claiming land that would one day be the southern half of Alabama and Mississippi. The resulting con

read more

3 Becoming a State

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 41-53

In August of 1814 representatives of the defeated Creeks gathered at Fort Jackson to learn their fate. It was all they feared, and more.The treaty forced on them took away over half the Creeks’ Alabama land. Then, in a move applauded by frontiersmen, Jackson ...

read more

4 Antebellum Alabama

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 54-71

William Wyatt Bibb did not live to see his creation, Cahawba, “vie with the largest inland towns in the country,” as he predicted it would. He was already ill, and a fall from his horse in July of 1820 aggravated his condition; a few days later he died. His brother, Thomas...

read more

5 Stumbling toward Secession

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 72-85

By the end of the 1820s political Alabama looked a lot like Israel Pickens and his supporters wanted it to look. The state bank was in taught politicians that success depended on a candidate’s ability to their enemies. Problem was, there were no enemies to speak of. So aspiring politicians were faced with the task of divining popular...

read more

6 Secession and Civil War

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 86-102

How to explain it? How to tell the tale of Yancey leading the Alabama delegation to the Democratic convention in 1860, introducing the Alabama Platform once again, to have it rejected once again, and walking out once again—but this time taking with him delegates from seven southern states? And then to tell of the Democrats,

read more

7 After the War That Never Ended

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 103-123

Now they came home, those who could. While there is no general agreement on the casualties Alabama suffered, all agree the sacrifice was great. The often-quoted figures, thirty-four thousand killed out of ninety thousand who served, with another thirty-five thousand disabled,...

read more

8 A World Made by Bourbons, for Bourbons

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 124-146

So what did they want, these Bourbons? They wanted a lot of things, as one of their number, John S. Graham explained. Born in 1848, Graham was a teenaged Civil War veteran who came home to clap together an education, become a staunch Democrat, and learn the newspapering...

read more

9 White Man’s Alabama

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 147-173

So the Bourbons settled in. James Oscar Prude opened a “bond and brokerage business” in Tuscaloosa, which he operated until 1909 when he retired to his plantation, “Owenwood.” Now a planter like his admired ancestors, he made a reputation for himself as a farsighted agriculturalist who applied “modern...

read more

10 Depression and War

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 174-199

It was an old, worn saying that the Great Depression came to Ala-tenants. Prices for their product had been sliding since the war, and hopes for paying out, catching up, getting ahead had faded back into the old cycle of borrowing, debt, and carrying over. That was for was invaded by the boll weevil, an insidious insect that bored into...

read more

11 Alabama after the War: “Big Jim” and Beyond

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 200-223

It wasn’t the same. Johnny (and Jane) knew it right off. The buildings had not changed much. Though people were a little older, their faces were comfortably familiar. But these folks were prosperous,had jobs, money in the bank. When the inductees left for war the effects of the depression still hung around like an unwelcome guest....

read more

12 Old Times There Should Not Be Forgotten

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 224-248

It is hard to explain, even now, after thinking about it so many years, just why segregation worked. Not how it worked—rules, regulations, customs, conventions, laws, and legalisms can accomplish all sorts of injustices—but why? Why so many good white people, church-going...

read more

13 The Age of Wallace

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 249-275

This is how George Wallace summed up his situation, his dilemma: “I started off talking about schools and highways and prisons and taxes, and I couldn’t make them listen. Then I began talking about niggers—and they stomped the floor.”

read more

14 The Age of Wallace and After

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 276-302

It can be argued, successfully I think, that Alabama changed more in the two decades after Brown v. Board of Education than it did in the seventy-five years preceding it. The Civil Rights movement altered things in ways that Alabama liberals of the 1930s and 1940s could hardly have believed possible. Moreover, and some may take issue...

read more

Epilogue: To Sum It Up

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 303-308

And there you have it. As the new century begins, Alabama might be, could be, on the verge of changing the system that most observers credit with keeping the state at or near the bottom of just about every ranking that progressive folks don’t want to be at the bottom of. OR, Alabama might be,...

read more

Bibliographical Essay

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 309-320

The decision to present readers with the following bibliography rather than identify sources in traditional academic footnotes was based on a number of considerations. First, this is not a traditional, academic study. It is not based on exhaustive primary research in archives, courthouses...

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 321-325