Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. C-iii

Title

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. iv-iv

Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-x

read more

Introduction: Human Rights Hegemony in the American Century

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-16

America resembles a huge giant who is just beginning to wake up to the fact that he is not alone nor can be left alone in the world, that he must try to get along with others who have been there all the time and who in fact are now pressing on him, and that in this necessary and sudden association something, perhaps something big, is expected of him. He is just beginning ...

read more

1 The Study of Peace, Human Rights, and International Organization

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 17-43

Signed by representatives from fifty- one nations on June 26, 1945, the UN Charter placed a commitment to international human rights at the core of the organization’s raison d’être. The second stanza of the preamble proclaims an abiding “faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person, in the equal rights of men and women and of nations large and small.” Among its four main purposes, the charter holds...

read more

2 A Pacific Charter

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 44-73

A month after the United States entered World War II, a small group of Americans sent President Franklin Roosevelt a private telegram detailing the need for the United States to embrace war aims and policies that were more definitively antiracist and anti- imperialist. The telegram was signed by five longtime supporters of a more egalitarian racial order both domestically...

read more

3 Carlos Romulo, Freedom of Information, and the Philippine Pattern

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 74-102

Carlos Romulo left San Francisco buoyant about the future. The new United Nations Organization was far from perfect, but he believed the charter and the process by which it was negotiated signaled the advent of a new global order. As he had told his fellow UNCIO delegates at the closing plenary session, “the fact that fifty nations, representing perhaps fifty basic ...

read more

4 Charles Malik, the International Bill of Rights, and Ultimate Things

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 103-133

Shortly after the conclusion of the first session of the United Nations General Assembly, members of the U.S. delegation submitted a memorandum to the State Department detailing their assessment of the “politics and personnel” of the UN. Lebanese representative Dr. Charles H. Malik, they reported, had become considerably more skilled as a diplomat since the San ...

read more

5 The NAACP, the ABA, and the Logic of Containment

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 134-169

Shortly before the start of the 1948 General Assembly session that would see the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, U.S. secretary of state George Marshall received a memorandum from his newly established Policy Planning Staff. Intended to offer broad, strategic analysis and advice in developing postwar foreign policies, the office was short- lived...

read more

Conclusion: Toward Universal Human Rights

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 170-176

On June 11, 1960, Charles Malik took the stage before a small audience in Williamsburg, Virginia. After fifteen years of diplomatic and government service, he had just returned to the academic life that he regarded as his true calling, teaching philosophy as a visiting professor at Dartmouth during the spring semester. In Williamsburg, however, he was billed as a former...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 177-220

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 221-224

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 225-226