Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. C-ii

Title Page

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. iii-iii

Copyright Page

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. iv-iv

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

List of Illustrations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Foreword

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

Since the seventies, Robin Wright has immersed himself in the study of the shamanic practices of the Baniwa of Northwest Amazonia. In this book—much of which is seen through the eyes of the elder jaguar shaman and “wise man” or prophet of his people, Manuel “Mandu” da Silva—the ancient ways of the Baniwa shamans come...

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xviii

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-28

This book explores the meanings of shamanic knowledge and power among the Baniwa, an Arawak-speaking indigenous people of the Northwest Amazon in Brazil, with whom I have worked since 1976. It focuses on the only living jaguar shaman among the Baniwa, Mandu da Silva of the village of Uapui, Aiary River, who...

Part 1: Shamans, Chanters, Sorcerers, and Prophets

read more

Chapter 1: “You Are Going to Save Many Lives”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 31-52

Mandu da Silva is the only living jaguar shaman among the Baniwa/ Kuripako population of the Northwest Amazon. In the 1970s and 1980s, he was chief of the village of Uapui on the Aiary River. Mandu’s story is extraordinary in many ways. It bears similarities to the life narratives of the powerful jaguar shamans and prophets ...

read more

Chapter 2: Mandu’s Apprenticeship and a Jaguar Shaman’s Powers of World-Making

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 53-104

As part of my interpretation of Mandu’s life story, I will integrate his narrative with an ethnography of the process of becoming a pajé, what the community expects of pajés, and what special powers and knowledge they acquire during their careers....

read more

Chapter 3: “You Will Suffer Along Our Way”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 105-144

In his life narrative, Mandu refers to periods of much suffering, and there are strong reasons to believe that his suffering was related to the deaths of many members of his family caused by a single sorcerer, who was a sib-brother, from the early 1970s until 1989. ...

Part 2: Shamanic Knowledge and Power in the Baniwa Universe

read more

Chapter 4: Creation, Cosmology, and Ecological Time

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 147-207

This chapter discusses the metaphysical and ecological principles through which the Baniwa pajés of the upper Aiary River understand their universe (Hekwapi). The most knowledgeable sources on this are the experienced and powerful jaguar shamans. Here I seek to build on and revise previously published versions of cosmology...

read more

Chapter 5: Mythscapes as Living Memories of the Ancestors

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 208-230

Ethnographic mapping shows that there is an extensive “sacred geography” in Baniwa-Kuripako-Wakuenai territory along the Northwest Amazon border of Brazil, Venezuela, and Colombia that consists of important locations of northern Arawakan creation traditions. This includes waterfalls with petroglyphs and ...

Part 3: Transmission of Shamanic Knowledge and Power

read more

Chapter 6: The Birth of the Child of the Sun, Kuwai

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 233-246

The child Kuwai is an extraordinary being — the child of the sun, who is spirit, animal, and person all in one. Part jaguar, part sloth or other tree-living animal, he can transform into a set of beautiful, melodious songs, or he can transform into a mysterious, monstrous, all-consuming, demonic Other. Kuwai is a complex...

read more

Chapter 7: Death and Regeneration in the First Initiation Rites, Kwaipan

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 247-275

Initiation is a major transformative moment when the children become adults and are taught to live well in society and the world. The children are taught the differences between truth and falsity, the Other World and This World. They see the full force of the cosmic jaguar that Kuwai becomes, as he devours three children ...

read more

Chapter 8: The Struggle for Power and Knowledge among Men and Women

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 276-294

Nhiãperikuli initiated his son with the flutes and told him to bathe in the river at dawn and cleanse his penis with a sudsmaking vine. Before the boy arose, Kuwai’s mother, Amaru, and the women secretly stole the flutes from Nhiãperikuli. As he tried to get them back, spirit darts shot from the mouths of...

Part 4: Revitalization Movements in Traditional and Christianized Communities

read more

Chapter 9: The House of Shamans’ Knowledge and Power, the House of Adornment, and the Pamaale School Complex

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 297-324

The pajés’ songs, discourses about the Other World, and stories of the prophets refer to a place of eternal happiness, Kathimakwe, at or near the top of the universe but hidden to all but the jaguar shamans. Those pajés are believed to have the power to reveal it through the correct transformations. Their bodies become the ...

read more

Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 325-336

In August 2010, when this book was in its early stages, an historic advance in favor of the protection of indigenous knowledge — in particular, shamanism and the sacred traditions related to “Yurupary” — was announced by the Colombian government. This measure was acclaimed by one unidentified anthropologist as “quite ...

Appendix 1

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 337-338

Appendix 2

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 339-342

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 343-352

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 353-364

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 365-387