Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Frontmatter

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-xii

In many important ways, Alabama is one of the best places on earth to live. Few states possess as much natural beauty. Its lakes and rivers teem with fish, and its lush pine and hardwood forests are full of wildlife. Alabama is among a rare fraternity of states that feature both beaches and mountains. You can travel the world and not find a sweeter group of people. People still pull over ...

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xiv

read more

1. Shadows and Light

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-25

In Frank Lawrence Owsley’s thirty-page contribution to I’ll Take My Stand, he suggested a southern ethos that subsequent historians identified as little more than the defiant challenge of a young Turk looking to make his mark in a world spiraling into modernity. Owsley’s work, “The Irrepressible Conflict,” assessed the origins of the Civil War from a perspective considered implau-...

read more

2. Reconstruction Redux, 1963

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 26-63

In 1963, George Wallace found Alabama ripe for harvest.
Beset by staggering poverty, a prevailing sentiment of anti-intellectualism, and decades of ineffective, inattentive, or just plain incompetent governance, Alabamians had come to accept comparative inferiority and underdog status as a byproduct of their culture. ...

read more

3. Sins of Omission, Sins of Commission, 1964

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 64-100

George Wallace welcomed the new year with a tremendous amount of confidence. Buoyed by a thriving national economy, the administration attracted $336.8 million in new and expanded industry during its maiden year. State docks profits topped the $1 million mark for the first time since 1956. Total freight entering the state shipping facilities reached an all-time high of ...

read more

4. Checks and Balances, 1965

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 101-139

On the third day of the new year, Martin Luther King traveled to Selma to launch a drive to register black Alabamians to vote. King, who had just been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, was typically confident in his remarks: “To-day marks the beginning of a determined, organized, mobilized, campaign to get the right to vote everywhere in Alabama. If we are refused, we will appeal ...

read more

5. Means to an End, 1966

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 140-179

The first glimpses of a new social and political order were dawning in Alabama. A century of unchecked rural power was washed away in the court-ordered reapportionment of the state legislature. The next election would give urban-oriented counties and major municipalities commensurate representation for the first time in state history. Federal voting registrars were chang-...

read more

6. One Governor, Two Governors, or No Governor? 1967–1968

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 180-221

Lurleen Wallace prepared for her inauguration as Alabama’s forty-seventh governor confident that the following four years would bring amazing changes. Daughter Peggy was sixteen and soon to be out of the house and on her own. Husband George was orchestrating a nationwide presidential run and chomping at the bit to get back on the campaign trail. Martha Brewer, wife of Lieu-...

read more

7. Crossroads, 1968–1970

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 222-267

On the night before Lurleen Wallace died, Press Secretary Ed Ewing received a call from one of the governor’s physicians. “Ed,” Hamilton Hutchinson confided, “you need to get a good night’s rest tonight because you are going to be busy tomorrow.” Ewing, conditioned to working in an environment where communication was based on assumption, knew exactly what Hutchinson was ...

read more

8. Turning Point, 1970–1972

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 268-301

With Albert Brewer dispatched, Wallace moved quickly to distance himself from the bitter tenor of the campaign and to assure Alabamians that he intended to keep his numerous campaign promises. “We will have a progressive administration,” Wallace told Associated Press reporter Rex Thomas, “that will attempt . . . to care for the needs of the people of our state. . . . And I’ll be ...

read more

9. A New Reality, 1972–1974

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 302-337

In the minutes and hours after Bremer’s cowardly act, a flurry of activity commenced. Cornelia Wallace flung herself on top of her husband’s supine body, shielding him from additional bullets that she anticipated being fired. Her fashionable bright yellow and white outfit and matching yellow shoes absorbed blotches of blood. “I’m shot,” Wallace told his wife. “I’ve been shot.” ...

read more

10. Stuck in Neutral, 1974–1978

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 338-374

For George Wallace, the fall of 1974 was as full of promise as the colorful bursts of autumn-blooming azaleas and flowering trees that splashed red, white, and purple hues across the state’s lush green backdrop. Battling constant pain—emotionally and physically— Wallace nonetheless basked in the glow of the easiest gubernatorial campaign of his life and anticipated a looming presiden-...

read more

11. The Last Campaign, 1982–1987

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 375-406

While 1978 closed without the satisfying feeling of winning an election, the new year came with none of the typical encumbrances for George Wallace. Gone was the responsibility of navigating through the swarms of federal court orders. As a former governor, Wallace had no need to huddle with floor leaders or plot an administration legislative package. No appointments needed to be ...

Appendix: People Interviewed

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 407

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 409-474

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 475-489