Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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p. v

List of Illustrations

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface and Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xv

One of the lesser-known aspects of Americanist archaeology is the substantial role played by the National Research Council during the 1920S and 1930S. Our use of the term "lesser-known" is not meant to imply that the role of the National Research Council (NRC) has gone unreported (see Griffin 1976a, 1985; Guthe 1952, 1967) but rather that its critical importance in shaping the course and complexion of Americanist archaeology ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-83

The creation of the National Research Council (NRC) in 1916 reflected a growing concern that the United States was ill-prepared to enter a war into which it was inexorably being pulled. The council's express purpose was to assist the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), which had been signed into existence by President Abraham Lincoln in 1863, in advancing the cause of knowledge and advising the federal government on matters of science and technology. From its inception ...

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1. Report of the Conference on Midwestern Archaeology, St. Louis, 1929

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pp. 85-206

The Committee on State Archmological Surveys of the National Research Council has been active for several years in promoting the conservation and scientific study of the prehistoric Indian sites scattered through the states bordering on the Mississippi River and its tributaries. The appalling destruction of these sites by individuals ignorant or careless of their value, and by commercial exploiters, has extinguished much valuable historical evidence. ...

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2. Conference on Southern Pre-History, Birmingham, 1932

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pp. 207-331

The Conference on Southern Pre-History held at Birmingham, Alabama, on December 18,19, and 20, 1932, was called for the purposes of reviewing the available information on the pre-history of the southeastern states, discussing the best methods of approach to archaeology in this region and its general problems, and developing closer cooperation through the personal contacts of the members of the conference. ...

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3. The Indianapolis Archaeological Conference, 1935

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pp. 333-427

During recent years the amount of data relating to the archaeological cultures of the northern Mississippi Valley and the Great Lakes region has grown considerably, due in large measure to the increased field and laboratory research within this area. The attempts to define the several cultures and to determine their relationships demonstrated the need for a conference of the students actively concerned with the archaeological problems of this area to establish, if possible, a uniform methodology and a greater correlation ...

Appendix 1. State Archaeological Surveys: Suggestions in Method and Technique

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pp. 429-453

Appendix 2. Guide Leaflet for Amateur Archaeologists

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pp. 455-467

Index

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pp. 469-483