Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

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IntroductionThere’s No Case Like Home

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pp. 1-39

Nouns in English, as a rule, do not have full-fledged declensions and equally seldom have distinct cases. Certainly English has no case as specialized as the locative, the case that subsumes prepositional markers indicating location, at, in, on. Languages that do feature locative cases include Latin, Sanskrit, and Old English, though lexicographers of English agree that the language lost...

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“Stock the Parish with Beauties”

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pp. 40-82

While no British Parliament of the eighteenth century ever met to outlaw chivalric romance, the nation’s unacknowledged legislators certainly did. Poets and reviewers subjected the motifs and themes of romance to derision and made its characteristic sensibilities vehicles for satire. In The Rape of the Lock, the Baron “to Love an altar built, / Of twelve vast French ...

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An Englishwoman’s WorkhouseIs Her Castle

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pp. 83-124

The young unmarried woman in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century British fiction may be the most overdetermined character in all of English literature. We always find congregating about her a throng of themes, contests, anxieties, polemics, and proprieties. Our heroine has been seen dallying with the formation of modern subjectivity, with public literacy and mass education,...

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Home and Away

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pp. 125-169

Something curious begins to happen in early nineteenth-century depictions of private domesticity. In the last decade of the eighteenth century, novelists, and others, had celebrated home as an enclosed, self-sustaining refuge, unchanging and impervious to the foreign. But homes in early nineteenth-century fiction take on a less idyllic aspect. Writers start to condemn them as ...

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There’s No Home-Like Place

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pp. 170-214

Just like their English counterparts, early nineteenth-century Scott ish novelists tend to fi nd home too hermetic or prison-like. In Elizabeth Hamilton’s 1808 The Cott agers of Glenburnie, for example, the kindly but not indulgent Mrs. Mason goes to live as housekeeper to the MacClarty family (“clarty” means “dirty”) in the remote Highland village of the title and fi nds their cott age intolerable...

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Conclusion

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pp. 215-226

One of the attributes that has helped home maintain such a durable and tenacious influence in English-speaking territories is the difficulty of defining its essential attributes. Definitions of home tend to rely on negation (home begins where narratable action ends; it is untroubled by commerce, history, and politics) or on supplementarity (home is the outward expression...

Notes

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pp. 227-260

Works Cited

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pp. 261-280

Index

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pp. 281-292

Prize Winners

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pp. 293-294