Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Series Page, Copyright, Dedication, Quote

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pp. 2-9

Contents

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pp. ix-x

Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xiv

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Introduction

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pp. 1-17

In June 2008, DreamWorks’ freshly minted animated comedy Kung Fu Panda 1 opened in multiple countries and regions, including the United States, China, and Hong Kong. By juxtaposing two quintessential icons of “Chineseness”— kung fu and a panda—this animation embodies Hollywood’s new trend of chinoiserie characterized by self-conscious appropriation and expropriation...

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1. The Goddess: Tracking the “Unknown Woman” from Hollywood through Shanghai to Hong Kong

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pp. 18-47

Maternal melodramas featuring self-sacrificial mothers abound in the history of world cinema. From classic Hollywood women’s films to Lars von Trier’s new-millennium musical drama Dancer in the Dark (2000), the mother figure works tirelessly for her child only to eventually withdraw herself from the child’s life in order to secure a prosperous future for him or...

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2. Family Resemblance, Class Conflicts: Re-version of the Sisterhood Singsong Drama

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pp. 48-81

A year before Ruan Lingyu’s “goddess” transforms herself into a blind-mute “captive mother” behind prison bars in 1934, Hu Die, the 1933 “Chinese Movie Queen,” who was to reprise Ruan’s role in both Cantonese and Mandarin Chinese in 1938, had already played a talking and singing mother, or, more precisely, two mothers (one rich, one poor) who are also twin sisters, in...

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3. The Love Parade Goes On: “Western-Costume Cantonese Opera Film” and the Foreignizing Remake

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pp. 82-112

When Ma Shizeng (1900–1964), a well-known Cantonese opera master, traveled to San Francisco in 1931, he brought a volume titled Qianli zhuangyou ji (Writings for My Long Journey to the United States), which he had compiled in preparation for this American trip. This volume contains his essays on how to reform Cantonese opera and how to mobilize opera as a vehicle of mass...

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4. Mr. Phantom Goes to the East: History and Its Afterlife from Hollywood to Shanghai and Hong Kong

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pp. 113-142

Lon Chaney (1883–1930), Jin Shan (1911–1982), and Leslie Cheung (1956–2003)—three actors from drastically different cultural and historical backgrounds—intersect at one point: at the height of their careers, they all played the disfigured and horrific phantom originating from The Phantom of the Opera. Springing from a 1909–1910 French gothic mystery novel by Gaston...

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Conclusion: Mr. Undercover Goes Global

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pp. 143-164

Writing in 1935, four years after his San Francisco trip and two years before the outbreak of the Second Sino-Japanese War, Cantonese opera master Ma Shizeng identified a crucial trend in Hollywood’s endeavor to harness China’s resources and market. For Ma, Hollywood’s plan of setting up production arms in Hong Kong to make quasi-Chinese epics for Chinese audiences would only jeopardize...

Notes

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pp. 165-190

Bibliography

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pp. 191-206

Filmography

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pp. 207-210

Index

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pp. 211-217

Production Notes, Back Cover

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pp. 233-234