Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. C-C

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

read more

INTRODUCTION

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-7

The seeds of this short book lie in my examination of Stephen Dodson Ramseur as a case study in the development of officers in the Army of Northern Virginia. I undertook that military biography more than thirty years ago, tracing the young North Carolinian’s rise from lieutenant to major general in just more than three years. In the course of reading Ramseur’s voluminous correspondence, ...

read more

CHAPTER ONE: Conduct Must Conform to the New Order of Things: R. E. Lee and the Question of Loyalty

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 8-34

Robert E. Lee should not be understood as a figure defined primarily by his Virginia identity. As with almost all his fellow American citizens, he manifested a range of loyalties during the late antebellum and wartime years. Without question devoted to his home state, where his family had loomed large in politics and social position since the colonial era, he also possessed deep attachments...

read more

CHAPTER TWO: He Died as Became a Confederate Soldier: Stephen Dodson Ramseur’s Easy Embrace of the Confederacy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 35-56

Stephen Dodson Ramseur typifi ed a cohort of young men from slaveholding families who made an early and zealous commitment to the idea of a Confederate nation. Reared during the increasing sectional tensions of the 1840s and 1850s, Ramseur developed a powerful sense of southern identity that guided his actions during the secession crisis and into the war years, more than did...

read more

CHAPTER THREE: Consistent Conservative: Jubal A. Early’s Patriotic Submission

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 57-82

Jubal Anderson Early seemingly defines staunch Confederate national loyalty. As an important general in the Army of Northern Virginia, he participated in nearly all the great battles of the Eastern Theater, became widely known for his anti-Yankee rhetoric, and proved willing to lay a hard hand on northern civilian property. Following the war, he assumed a position in the front rank of Lost ...

read more

CHAPTER FOUR: For His Country and His Duty: Confederate National Sentiment beyond Appomattox

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 83-92

Robert E. Lee and Jubal A. Early occupied critical positions in the story of how Confederate national sentiment persisted in the postwar decades. Stephen Dodson Ramseur, mortally wounded almost six months before Appomattox, was relegated to a secondary though still noteworthy place in the narrative. All had been committed nationalists, demanding collective sacrifice to establish...

Images

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. Image 1-Image 16

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 93-108

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 109-118

Further Reading

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 119-120