Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. C-C

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Table of Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xiv

read more

Introduction: Criticism

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-22

The last time I saw Ellen Willis was in the late spring of 2006, when we met to discuss my dissertation, a project I would later revise into this book. Now, I can only remember snippets of our encounter. Out of respect for the graduate students on strike as New York University’s administration blocked their efforts to unionize, she insisted we meet off campus, choosing...

read more

1. Village

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 23-42

On October 30, 1955, the New York Times announced to the rest of the city word of a new downtown newspaper. Called the Village Voice, it printed its first issue on October 26 and sold for five cents every Wednesday at Lower Manhattan vendors. Editor Dan Wolf and publisher Ed Fancher intended to make their paper Village-centric not just in distribution. Localism also governed its choice of writers—as Wolf put it, the neighborhood teemed...

read more

2. Pop

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 43-73

Over the course of Goldstein’s polemic, his tone grew more urgent—one might even say incensed. “We learn to tell Dostoevski from Spillane, but we know nothing about the flicks,” he wrote. “We learn to tell Rembrandt from Keane, but we know nothing about advertising.” Here, in the fourth edition of his new ...

read more

3. Hype

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 74-97

The above is an excerpt from Richard Goldstein’s “Giraffe Hunters,” a piece he wrote toward the end of 1966. Its graphic imagery portended what would be the overwhelming theme of his writing as his tenure at the Voice came to a close: the industry’s violent, dramatic capture of the spirit of rock. Coming just months after his column’s enthusiastic beginning, “Giraffe Hunters”...

read more

4. Identity

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 98-122

The Voice critics who wrote into 1969 and beyond continued to question the efficacy of a rock-fueled revolution—a debate deeply intertwined with concerns over whether rock culture was losing its momentum, cogency, and meaning. Christgau professed his ambivalence in his column Rock & Roll &, writing “Rock and roll . . . is going to revolutionize the world,” before...

read more

5. Mattering

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 123-136

The 1970s secured Christgau’s standing as one of rock criticism’s most perspicacious observers as well as its eagerest workhorse. As editor of the Voice music section, he steered the writing of numerous prominent critics; his tireless effort at the Consumer Guide, for a number of years printed in the Voice as well as Creem, guaranteed that his writing style and taste preferences...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 137-156

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 157-160

About the Author, Back Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 161-BC