Cover

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Contents

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p. 5

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Foreword

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pp. 7-8

Perhaps no other philosopher poses greater difficulties for his readers or promises greater rewards for diligent study than Hegel. In writing of the dividends to be derived from the "supreme thought-treasure" of Hegel's works, John N. Findlay has rightly praised Hegel's "stock of invaluable methodological principles by which one's own thought may be guided." Among these principles is Hegel's concern to preserve the unity of...

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Introduction

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pp. 9-47

Hegel's essay The Scientific Ways of Treating Natural Law appeared in two consecutive parts (December 1802 and May 1803) of the Kritisches Journal der Philosophie.l This Journal ran from January 1802 until May 1803 and was edited by "Fr. Wilh. Joseph Schelling and Ge. Wilhelm Fr. Hegel" who between them wrote all the contents. The general aims of the Kritisches Journal are stated in...

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Translator's Note

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pp. 49-51

This translation is based on Hegel's original periodical publication, now reprinted in the magnificient new edition of his Works. See vol. 4, ed. by H. Biichner and O. Poggeler (Hamburg, 1968). The page references in the foot of the translation are to the pages of this edition. One or two references in my notes to this edition are described as "Poggeler". However I have adopted some...

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The Scientific Ways of Treating Natural Law, Its Place in Moral Philosophy, and Its Relation to the Positive Sciences of Law

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pp. 53-133

The science of natural law, like other sciences such as mechanics and physics, has long been recognized as an essentially philosophical science and, since philosophy must have parts, as an essential part of philosophy. But with the other sciences it has shared a common fate; the philosophical element in philosophy is assigned exclusively to metaphysics, while the sciences have been allowed little share in it. On the contrary, in their special principle they have been kept aloof...

Index

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pp. 135-137