Cover

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pp. C-C

Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Foreword

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pp. vii-xii

Growing up Christian in the mid-twentieth century South—amid the first stirrings of neofundamentalism; the waning days of the social gospel movement; diminishing anti-Catholic, anti-Jewish Protestant sectarianism; and the glacial receding of religious sectionalism—produced some exceptional religious biographies. David Edwin Harrell’s is one of them....

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Preface

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pp. xiii-xvi

When the editors of this volume of essays honoring David Edwin Harrell asked me to provide a preface, I felt honored and readily agreed. What could be easier? Summarize the book’s chapters, reflect on my own reading of his work, toss in a few stories from thirty years of sipping coffee with him at “the meetings,” and ship it off. As it turned out, however, that assumption...

Acknowledgments

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pp. xvii-xx

Part I

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1. David Edwin Harrell Jr.: American Religious Historian

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pp. 3-14

“All history writing is autobiographical.” Not quite, not exactly. But that statement, hardly indisputable truth, does lead us toward some insight into the dynamics of the historian’s practice of his craft.
My respect for David Edwin Harrell Jr. is too great, and my sensitivity too genuine, I trust, for me to claim exhaustive knowledge of why he writes as he does. But I have both right and responsibility to ponder the outlines...

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2. Elijah’s Never-Failing Cruse of Oil: David Harrell and the Historiography of America’s Pentecostals

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pp. 15-23

From my days as a graduate student at the University of Arkansas, I re-call one Sunday afternoon when David Harrell and I attended a church dedication service in nearby Rogers, Arkansas, conducted by our mutual friend Vinson Synan. On the way back to campus, we discussed personal insight into our own religious traditions—for me the Pentecostal Holiness ...

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3. David Edwin Harrell Jr. and the History of the Stone-Campbell Tradition

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pp. 24-32

David Edwin Harrell Jr. has taught me much about the craft of historical writing, about the role of social factors in religious history, and about the multitude of forces that have shaped my own religious tradition, the Churches of Christ. He has published three major books on the Churches of Christ, each of them pioneering in its own right, along with numerous ...

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4. David Edwin Harrell Jr. and the Broadening of Southern Religious Studies

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pp. 33-40

David Edwin Harrell Jr. is one of the founding fathers in the study of religion in the American South, and his legacy was to broaden the field into productive areas that have become central aspects of the study of not only southern religion but also the history of the South itself. The academic study of religion in the South took a giant leap in the 1960s, with what...

Part II

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5. The Midas Touch: Kenneth E. Hagin and the Prosperity Gospel

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pp. 43-59

By his own account Kenneth Hagin’s life was nothing short of a miracle. After barely surviving his premature birth in 1917, he then suffered from a congenital heart defect until he was a teenager. In 1933 he had a neardeath experience during which his heart stopped three times and he received “visions” of what hell was like. He remained bedridden for several...

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6. Rock Fights, Quarantines, and Confessionals: B. C.Goodpasture, the Gospel Advocate, and Keeping Order in Churches of Christ

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pp. 60-83

On Sunday, January 8, 1950, the New York Times carried a front- page story about the stoning of Ameri can missionaries in Italy. The missionaries, thirteen in all, arrived in Italy in January 1949 under the sponsorship of the Crescent Hill Church of Christ in Brownfield, Texas. Operating on temporary visas, they preached in towns near Rome, established an orphanage...

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7. Northern Millenarian Fundamentalism in the South, 1900–1950

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pp. 84-99

Scholars of religion in the South have often argued for its distinctive character, a trait rooted in the region’s unique history and accompanying social and cultural isolationism. A shared history and isolationism combined to produce a remarkable uniformity in religious beliefs and practices through out the South. This traditional narrative of southern religious life...

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Conclusion: The Very Civil Convictions of Ed Harrell

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pp. 100-106

A few years ago, I arrived at the Disciples of Christ Historical Society in Nashville to research the early printing work of Alexander Campbell. After announcing my intentions, the woman behind the desk asked, “And are you a Disciple?” I hesitated. If I admitted that I was not, would I be allowed in? In a split sec ond, I made my decision. “No,” I said, “but I do know Ed Harrell!” ...

Notes

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pp. 107-126

Contributors

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pp. 127-130

Index

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pp. 131-137