Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. 2-5

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Introduction to the 2003 Edition

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pp. vii-xiv

The first native peoples of what is now the United States to meet and interact with Europeans on a long-range basis were the peoples of the lower Southeast. Their naming systems were flexible and fluid. They had no global imaging of themselves. They were—individual isolates and a few controversies aside—elements of the larger Maskókî linguistic family ...

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I. Introduction

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pp. xv-xviii

Most of the Indian geographic names in Florida are derived from three languages of the Muskhogean familythe Seminole, the Hitchiti, and the Choctaw. The Seminole is so closely related to the Creek or Muskogee language that the two may be regarded as identical; the Hitchiti forms a linguistic union with the Mikasuki; ...

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II. Symbols and Abbreviations

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pp. xix-xxii

In the transcription of the Indian sources of placenames ch sounds as in "chin," j as in "gin," and a Roman l as in Welsh "Lloyd." H, when followed by a consonant, as in Creek holahta, is like German ch. Other consonants resemble the corresponding ones in English. ...

III. List of Geographic Names

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pp. 1-24

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1. Names from the Florida Dialects

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pp. 1-42

Alachua was a former Seminole town, which was settled by Creeks from Oconee, Georgia, sometime in the first half of the eighteenth century. The name was afterwards applied to other settlements in the neighborhood, in which the most important town was called Cuscowilla or Alachua. ...

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2. Florida Names of Dubious and Unknown Origin

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pp. 43-55

Alafia, according to Hodge, was a small Seminole town (1836) near the river of the same name, whose inhabitants were probably led by one "Chief Alligator" during the Seminole War of 1835-1842.37 ...

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3. Imported Names

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pp. 56-66

CASSADAGA. A village with eighty-three inhabitants in Volusia County. Cassadaga is the name of a lake, a creek, and a village in Chautauqua County, New York. The name is said to be derived from Iroquois gusdago, "under the rocks."56 ...

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4. Sundry Names on Taylor's War Map

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pp. 67-69

ARTA HATCHEE. A stream in what is now Okeechobee County. As there is no r in Seminole, Creek, Hitchiti, and Choctaw, Arta is probably a corruption of Creek oto, "chestnut," or Creek àta, "lizzard." Hatchee is, of course, Creek hàchi, "creek." ...

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IV. Names of Various Indian Chiefs

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pp. 70-77

On May 9, 1832, a treaty between the United States and the Seminole Nation of Indians was made at Payne's Landmg, twenty-five miles down the Oklawaha River, in the territory of Florida, in accordance with which the Seminoles were to relinquish all claim to their lands in Florida, and emigrate West to the country of the Creeks, within three years after the ratification of the treaty. ...

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V. Conclusion

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pp. 78-79

The prosaic character of the native geographic names in Florida is remarkable. Animals, fish, reptiles, trees, conspicious features of the landscape, trivial incidents, and personal names form the chief sources from which these names are drawn-drawn, with keen powers of observation, it is true, but apparently with little or no display of emotion on the part of the Indian. ...

List of Publications Most Frequently Consulted

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pp. 80-103

Index of Names

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pp. 81-83