In this Book

The Vampire in Nineteenth Century English Literature
summary
Carol A. Senf traces the vampire’s evolution from folklore to twentieth-century popular culture and explains why this creature became such an important metaphor in Victorian England. This bloodsucker who had stalked the folklore of almost every culture became the property of serious artists and thinkers in Victorian England, including Charlotte and Emily Brontë, George Eliot, Charles Dickens, Karl Marx, and Friedrich Engels. People who did not believe in the existence of vampires nonetheless saw numerous metaphoric possibilities in a creature from the past that exerted pressure on the present and was often threatening because of its sexuality.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. 1-1
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. i-iv
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  1. Acknowledgements
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Chapter One: Blood, Eroticism, and the Twentieth-Century Vampire
  2. pp. 1-16
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  1. Chapter Two: The Origins of Modern Myth
  2. pp. 17-30
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  1. Chapter Three: The Vampire as Gothic Villain
  2. pp. 31-74
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  1. Chapter Four: Suspicions Confirmed, Suspicions Denied
  2. pp. 75-93
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  1. Chapter Five: Myth Becomes Metaphor in Realistic Fiction
  2. pp. 94-139
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  1. Chapter Six: Making Sense of the Changes
  2. pp. 140-164
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 165-193
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 194-204
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  1. Back Cover
  2. pp. 214-214
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