Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. vii

List of Illustrations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

read more

Chapter 1. Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-16

Americans love to hate political campaigns. Voters find them tire-some, politicians find them draining, and scholars find them shallow. As a consequence, the list of campaign reform proposals grows longer with each election cycle. For example, the Alliance for Better Campaigns wants broadcasters to provide free air time...

read more

Chapter 2. Democratic Theory and the Campaign Information Environment

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 17-39

Popular criticisms of campaigns tend to focus on their negativity and, perhaps less often, on the way they are financed, which has led reformers to concentrate on these issues. Yet, plunging headlong into reform without developing a comprehensive and systematic critique of campaigns is putting the cart before the horse...

read more

Chapter 3. Electoral Competitiveness and the Campaign Information Environment

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 40-62

Chapter 2 suggested that adopting reforms that enhance electoral competitiveness might be the most promising way of improving campaign information environments for voters. Although there is certainly an abundance of literature suggesting that competitive campaigns generate more information...

read more

Chapter 4. Competitiveness and Campaign Knowledge in Congressional Elections

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 63-92

It is widely believed that competitive elections have a host of salutary effects on voters. Studies of Senate elections have concluded that competitive elections, “enliven and enrich people’s political life” by making citizens more knowledgeable about their political choices (Kahn and Kenney 1999, 7), while studies...

read more

Chapter 5. Competitiveness and Campaign Knowledge in a Presidential Election

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 93-116

The information environments generated by presidential elections are incredibly rich compared to those in congressional contests and other down- ticket races. In addition to the information generated by major campaign events such as the conventions and debates, presidential candidates and their supporters have far more...

read more

Chapter 6. Competitiveness and Political Participation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 117-149

It is virtually a clich

read more

Chapter 7. Improving Electoral Competitiveness Through Reform

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 150-177

Electoral competitiveness is not an unmitigated good, but if one seeks to improve campaigns in America, the path to their improvement involves adopting reforms to ensure that more elections are not only contested but closely contested. Without competitive elections, candidates and their supporters have no incentive...

read more

Epilogue: Why Voters Are Not Excited by American Campaigns

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 178-187

The goal of this book has been to understand how the campaigns generated by competitive elections affect voters. For the most part, my analysis has shown that competitive elections, even those that are modestly or moderately competitive, generate information environments that help voters learn...

Appendix

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 189-212

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 213-225

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 227-241

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 243-246

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 247-249

This book was very long in the making. As a result, I am indebted to a somewhat alarming number of people. I owe my interest in campaign effects to Bruce Cain, who got me involved with a project funded by the Pew Charitable Trusts to study ethics (or rather, the lack thereof) in campaigns...